The Resource The black social economy in the Americas : exploring diverse community-based markets, Caroline Shenaz Hossein, editor, (electronic resource)

The black social economy in the Americas : exploring diverse community-based markets, Caroline Shenaz Hossein, editor, (electronic resource)

Label
The black social economy in the Americas : exploring diverse community-based markets
Title
The black social economy in the Americas
Title remainder
exploring diverse community-based markets
Statement of responsibility
Caroline Shenaz Hossein, editor
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
NhCcYBP
Dewey number
330.0899607
Index
no index present
LC call number
E29.N3
LC item number
B53 2018
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Hossein, Caroline Shenaz
  • ProQuest (Firm)
Series statement
Perspectives from social economics
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Blacks
  • Business enterprises, Black
  • Blacks
Label
The black social economy in the Americas : exploring diverse community-based markets, Caroline Shenaz Hossein, editor, (electronic resource)
Link
https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/ou/detail.action?docID=5049862
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgments; Contents; Biographies of Authors; List of Figure; List of Tables; Chapter 1: Daring to Conceptualize the Black Social Economy; 1.1 Addressing the Lack of a Black Perspective in the Social Economy; 1.2 Liberating Social Economy History; 1.3 Distinguishing Black Community-Based Economies; 1.4 Organization of Book; Works Cited; Chapter 2: Revisiting Ideas and Ideologies in African-American Social Economy: From the Past Forward; 2.1 Economic Ideas of Early African-American Thinkers; 2.2 Economic Ideas of the Civil Rights and Post-Civil Rights Period
  • 2.3 Contemporary Scenario2.4 Conclusion; Works Cited; Chapter 3: Drawing on the Lived Experience of African Canadians: Using Money Pools to Combat Social and Business Exclusion; 3.1 Relevance of Money Pools; 3.2 Methods; 3.3 Peer-to-Peer Lending and Black Canadians; 3.4 Money Pools Helping Black People; 3.5 Who Are the Banker Ladies?; 3.6 Misperceptions About Money Pools; 3.7 Why People Participate in Collective Banks; 3.8 A Personal Reflection: A Trinidadian-­Canadian's Use of Susu; 3.9 Carrying on the Susu Legacy; 3.10 Conclusion; Works Cited
  • Chapter 4: The Social Economy in a Jamaican Perspective4.1 The Social Economy in Jamaica; 4.2 The Jamaican Social Economy: From Maroons to Cooperatives and Rastafari Social Movements; 4.2.1 From Maroons to Free Villages; 4.2.2 Marcus Garvey and Rastafari: Bobo Ashanti, Nyabinghi, and Twelve Tribes of Israel; 4.3 State-Led Economy: 1970s; 4.4 Social Entrepreneurship and Its Contribution in Jamaica; 4.5 Defining the Social Economy and Social Entrepreneurship; 4.6 Typology of Social Enterprises in Jamaica; 4.7 Social Enterprises in Jamaica; 4.8 Social Enterprise Motivation and Core Values
  • 4.9 Policy Implications4.10 Conclusion; Works Cited; Chapter 5: Building Economic Solidarity: Caribbean ROSCAs in Jamaica, Guyana, and Haiti; 5.1 Black Women in the Social Economy; 5.2 Methods; 5.3 ROSCAs: Rooted in Community Development; 5.4 Jamaica's Partner Banks: Supporting Community Development; 5.5 Guyana's Boxhand: Combating Business Exclusion; 5.6 Haitian Banking Collectives: A Democratic Option; 5.7 Conclusion; Works Cited; Chapter 6: The Everyday Social Economy of Afro-Descendants in the Chocó, Colombia; 6.1 A Community Store: Production and the Failure of a Black Social Enterprise
  • 6.2 A Burial Society: Mortuary Ritual, Savings, and Collective Funeral Insurance6.3 Electrical Infrastructure: Work and Collective Labor; 6.4 A Party and the Gift: Exchange and Collective Politics; 6.5 Displaced Black Communities: Self-help and the Social Economy in Motion; 6.6 Conclusion: Toward an Everyday Black Social Economy; Works Cited; Chapter 7: The Social Economy of Afro-Argentines and African Immigrants in Buenos Aires; 7.1 Situating Race in the Social Economy; 7.2 An Overview of Past and Present Afro-­descendant and African Populations in Buenos Aires
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781137600479
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(NhCcYBP)ybp14812084
Label
The black social economy in the Americas : exploring diverse community-based markets, Caroline Shenaz Hossein, editor, (electronic resource)
Link
https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/ou/detail.action?docID=5049862
Publication
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgments; Contents; Biographies of Authors; List of Figure; List of Tables; Chapter 1: Daring to Conceptualize the Black Social Economy; 1.1 Addressing the Lack of a Black Perspective in the Social Economy; 1.2 Liberating Social Economy History; 1.3 Distinguishing Black Community-Based Economies; 1.4 Organization of Book; Works Cited; Chapter 2: Revisiting Ideas and Ideologies in African-American Social Economy: From the Past Forward; 2.1 Economic Ideas of Early African-American Thinkers; 2.2 Economic Ideas of the Civil Rights and Post-Civil Rights Period
  • 2.3 Contemporary Scenario2.4 Conclusion; Works Cited; Chapter 3: Drawing on the Lived Experience of African Canadians: Using Money Pools to Combat Social and Business Exclusion; 3.1 Relevance of Money Pools; 3.2 Methods; 3.3 Peer-to-Peer Lending and Black Canadians; 3.4 Money Pools Helping Black People; 3.5 Who Are the Banker Ladies?; 3.6 Misperceptions About Money Pools; 3.7 Why People Participate in Collective Banks; 3.8 A Personal Reflection: A Trinidadian-­Canadian's Use of Susu; 3.9 Carrying on the Susu Legacy; 3.10 Conclusion; Works Cited
  • Chapter 4: The Social Economy in a Jamaican Perspective4.1 The Social Economy in Jamaica; 4.2 The Jamaican Social Economy: From Maroons to Cooperatives and Rastafari Social Movements; 4.2.1 From Maroons to Free Villages; 4.2.2 Marcus Garvey and Rastafari: Bobo Ashanti, Nyabinghi, and Twelve Tribes of Israel; 4.3 State-Led Economy: 1970s; 4.4 Social Entrepreneurship and Its Contribution in Jamaica; 4.5 Defining the Social Economy and Social Entrepreneurship; 4.6 Typology of Social Enterprises in Jamaica; 4.7 Social Enterprises in Jamaica; 4.8 Social Enterprise Motivation and Core Values
  • 4.9 Policy Implications4.10 Conclusion; Works Cited; Chapter 5: Building Economic Solidarity: Caribbean ROSCAs in Jamaica, Guyana, and Haiti; 5.1 Black Women in the Social Economy; 5.2 Methods; 5.3 ROSCAs: Rooted in Community Development; 5.4 Jamaica's Partner Banks: Supporting Community Development; 5.5 Guyana's Boxhand: Combating Business Exclusion; 5.6 Haitian Banking Collectives: A Democratic Option; 5.7 Conclusion; Works Cited; Chapter 6: The Everyday Social Economy of Afro-Descendants in the Chocó, Colombia; 6.1 A Community Store: Production and the Failure of a Black Social Enterprise
  • 6.2 A Burial Society: Mortuary Ritual, Savings, and Collective Funeral Insurance6.3 Electrical Infrastructure: Work and Collective Labor; 6.4 A Party and the Gift: Exchange and Collective Politics; 6.5 Displaced Black Communities: Self-help and the Social Economy in Motion; 6.6 Conclusion: Toward an Everyday Black Social Economy; Works Cited; Chapter 7: The Social Economy of Afro-Argentines and African Immigrants in Buenos Aires; 7.1 Situating Race in the Social Economy; 7.2 An Overview of Past and Present Afro-­descendant and African Populations in Buenos Aires
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781137600479
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(NhCcYBP)ybp14812084

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