The Resource Regulating the Global Information Society

Regulating the Global Information Society

Label
Regulating the Global Information Society
Title
Regulating the Global Information Society
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
An outstanding line-up of contributors explore the regulation of the internet from an interdisciplinary perspective. In-depth coverage of this controversial area such as international political economy, law, politics, economics, sociology and internet regulation. Regulating the Global Information Society covers the differences between both US and UK approaches to regulation and establishes where policy is being made that will influence the future direction of the global information society, from commercial, democratic and middle-ground perspectives
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Marsden, Christopher
Dewey number
343.09/944
LC call number
K564.C6 -- R44 2000eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Routledge Studies in Globalisation
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Computer networks -- Law and legislation
  • Digital communications
  • Electronic books. -- local
  • Information society
  • Telecommunication -- Law and legislation
Label
Regulating the Global Information Society
Link
http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/oulaw/detail.action?docID=238749
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Book Cover -- Half-Title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Contributors -- Series editor's preface -- Acknowledgements -- Acronyms -- 1 Introduction -- Information Economy -- The commercialisation of the public Internet -- Information and communication technologies -- Globalisation and sovereignty -- Regulation -- Information market failure: network effects -- Microsoft -- Regulatory arbitrage -- Sovereignty, law and international relations -- Structure of the collection: regulating the GIS -- Economic efficiency and rights-based regulation -- International institutional standard setting -- Constitutionalism, legitimacy and self-regulation -- Notes -- Part I Theoretical perspectives -- 2 The role of the public sphere in the information society -- The roots of public sphere theory -- Privacy -- Notes -- 3 In search of the self -- Self-regulation: general concept and characteristics -- Defining self-regulation -- Regulation and regulatory tools -- Cost-benefit analysis -- Taxonomy of self-regulation -- Lessons from other industries -- The Internet -- The 'self' of Internet self-regulation -- Justification for Internet regulation: illegal and harmful content -- Self-regulatory mechanism -- Current examples and Internet practices -- Conclusions and recommendations: systematic self-regulation as a foundation -- Notes -- 4 Will electronic commerce change the law? -- A confrontation among actors -- The political process -- A locked society? -- Rules with various origins -- Rules created by authorities -- Rules created by communities -- Rules created by individuals -- Rules created by economic interactions -- Changes related to the Information Age -- The regulatory mechanism -- Impact of the Information Age on regulatory mechanism -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Part II The limits of telecommunications regulation
  • 5 How far can deregulation of telecommunications go? -- Introduction -- Stages of regulation -- Licensing and entry -- Regulating overall retail prices -- Universal service obligations -- Anti-competitive pricing -- Traditional interconnection -- The early days -- Switching to an incremental cost base -- The network price cap and deregulation -- Evaluation of UK experience to date -- How far can deregulation go? -- The growing importance of access -- Telecommunications law versus competition law -- How far can deregulation go? -- 6 Realising social goals in connectivity and content -- Paradigm crash -- Fairness -- Social goals: connectivity and content -- Telecommunications -- Broadcasting -- Internet regulation-broadcasting and telecommunications Mark III -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 7 Commentary -- What fundamental rules are needed for the information economy? -- Not understanding the wood for the trees -- Where to start -- What is changing? -- The Internet changes everything-or does it? -- What are the economic implications of this change? -- What needs to be done? -- Simple analysis, difficult solution -- Conclusion -- 8 The rise and decline of the international telecommunications regime -- Development of the ancien regime -- The organizational landscape -- Regime attributes -- From adaptation to transformation -- Incremental challenges to the ancien regime -- Regime transformation -- From transformation to decay -- External pressures on regime relevance -- Internal pressures on regime relevance -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 9 After Seattle -- Stumbling towards a new trade round -- Background -- Goals for Seattle -- What went wrong? -- Does it matter? -- Trade, the Internet, and the New Economy -- The old institutions, principles, and norms of telecom -- The breakup of AT&T and the erosion of monopoly -- The Empire strikes back -- The GATT strategy
  • Internet and convergence: the New Economy -- Towards next time -- Notes -- Part III International self-regulation and standard setting -- 10 Locating Internet governance -- What is Internet governance? -- A context-the DNS 'wars' -- How standards are set -- The traditional Internet standards process -- Other standards (and quasi-standards) processes -- Where is the Internet heading? -- Notes -- 11 Semi-private international rulemaking -- Domain names: the underlying issues -- The registration hierarchy -- The DN resolution hierarchy -- Domain names and trademarks -- Enter WIPO -- The consultation process -- Process difficulties -- WIPO process compared to other types of rulemaking -- Summary and conclusion -- Caveat lector -- Note -- Part IV Standard setting and competition policy -- 12 Will the Internet remake antitrust law? -- Notes -- 13 The problems of the third way -- The Java technologies and the market structure -- Sun's standard-setting efforts -- Sun's ISO standardization plan -- The problems of maintenance and intellectual property rights -- The collapse of Sun's ISO efforts -- Some implications of Sun's Java standardization experience -- Notes -- Part V The limits of government regulation -- 14 China's impact on the Global Information Society -- 'Sharing the same bed, but not the same dream' -- The international patchwork -- A different view -- Grasping the pen and the gun -- The Central Propaganda Department -- Bureaucratic rivalries -- Commerce and the Party-state -- Controlling the skies -- Media regulation without law -- Synergies of censorship and copyright -- The audiovisual tide -- The national cable link-up -- Guarding the gateways -- The firewall -- Filtering in, filtering out -- Dilemmas of ownership -- China and the Global Information Society -- Notes -- 15 Freedom versus access rights in a European context
  • Council of Europe: defining pluralism -- Fundamental right to freedom of expression -- European Union (EU) and national pluralism law -- Measures to encourage pluralism -- National rules to prevent vertical integration -- Frequency distribution policies -- A common framework for general authorisations and individual licences in the field of telecommunications services -- Towards a common framework for electronic communications infrastructure and associated services -- Access rights to essential facilities -- Programme requirements -- Programme networking -- Public broadcasting systems -- State aid -- Pluralism in the changing technological and economic environment -- Recent Council of Europe developments on media pluralism and access -- Notes -- 16 Pluralism, guidance and the new media -- Democracy and the media -- Variations on media pluralism -- Media guidance and pluralism -- The implications for new media -- Regulatory possibilities -- 17 Five challenges for regulating the Global Information Society -- Introduction -- Five challenges for policy-makers -- Old law or new law? -- Proportionality -- Flexibility -- Preserving values -- Transnational cooperation -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (388 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780203988893
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2017. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC238749
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL238749
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10094849
  • (OCoLC)936909664
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC238749
Label
Regulating the Global Information Society
Link
http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/oulaw/detail.action?docID=238749
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Book Cover -- Half-Title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Contributors -- Series editor's preface -- Acknowledgements -- Acronyms -- 1 Introduction -- Information Economy -- The commercialisation of the public Internet -- Information and communication technologies -- Globalisation and sovereignty -- Regulation -- Information market failure: network effects -- Microsoft -- Regulatory arbitrage -- Sovereignty, law and international relations -- Structure of the collection: regulating the GIS -- Economic efficiency and rights-based regulation -- International institutional standard setting -- Constitutionalism, legitimacy and self-regulation -- Notes -- Part I Theoretical perspectives -- 2 The role of the public sphere in the information society -- The roots of public sphere theory -- Privacy -- Notes -- 3 In search of the self -- Self-regulation: general concept and characteristics -- Defining self-regulation -- Regulation and regulatory tools -- Cost-benefit analysis -- Taxonomy of self-regulation -- Lessons from other industries -- The Internet -- The 'self' of Internet self-regulation -- Justification for Internet regulation: illegal and harmful content -- Self-regulatory mechanism -- Current examples and Internet practices -- Conclusions and recommendations: systematic self-regulation as a foundation -- Notes -- 4 Will electronic commerce change the law? -- A confrontation among actors -- The political process -- A locked society? -- Rules with various origins -- Rules created by authorities -- Rules created by communities -- Rules created by individuals -- Rules created by economic interactions -- Changes related to the Information Age -- The regulatory mechanism -- Impact of the Information Age on regulatory mechanism -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Part II The limits of telecommunications regulation
  • 5 How far can deregulation of telecommunications go? -- Introduction -- Stages of regulation -- Licensing and entry -- Regulating overall retail prices -- Universal service obligations -- Anti-competitive pricing -- Traditional interconnection -- The early days -- Switching to an incremental cost base -- The network price cap and deregulation -- Evaluation of UK experience to date -- How far can deregulation go? -- The growing importance of access -- Telecommunications law versus competition law -- How far can deregulation go? -- 6 Realising social goals in connectivity and content -- Paradigm crash -- Fairness -- Social goals: connectivity and content -- Telecommunications -- Broadcasting -- Internet regulation-broadcasting and telecommunications Mark III -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 7 Commentary -- What fundamental rules are needed for the information economy? -- Not understanding the wood for the trees -- Where to start -- What is changing? -- The Internet changes everything-or does it? -- What are the economic implications of this change? -- What needs to be done? -- Simple analysis, difficult solution -- Conclusion -- 8 The rise and decline of the international telecommunications regime -- Development of the ancien regime -- The organizational landscape -- Regime attributes -- From adaptation to transformation -- Incremental challenges to the ancien regime -- Regime transformation -- From transformation to decay -- External pressures on regime relevance -- Internal pressures on regime relevance -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 9 After Seattle -- Stumbling towards a new trade round -- Background -- Goals for Seattle -- What went wrong? -- Does it matter? -- Trade, the Internet, and the New Economy -- The old institutions, principles, and norms of telecom -- The breakup of AT&T and the erosion of monopoly -- The Empire strikes back -- The GATT strategy
  • Internet and convergence: the New Economy -- Towards next time -- Notes -- Part III International self-regulation and standard setting -- 10 Locating Internet governance -- What is Internet governance? -- A context-the DNS 'wars' -- How standards are set -- The traditional Internet standards process -- Other standards (and quasi-standards) processes -- Where is the Internet heading? -- Notes -- 11 Semi-private international rulemaking -- Domain names: the underlying issues -- The registration hierarchy -- The DN resolution hierarchy -- Domain names and trademarks -- Enter WIPO -- The consultation process -- Process difficulties -- WIPO process compared to other types of rulemaking -- Summary and conclusion -- Caveat lector -- Note -- Part IV Standard setting and competition policy -- 12 Will the Internet remake antitrust law? -- Notes -- 13 The problems of the third way -- The Java technologies and the market structure -- Sun's standard-setting efforts -- Sun's ISO standardization plan -- The problems of maintenance and intellectual property rights -- The collapse of Sun's ISO efforts -- Some implications of Sun's Java standardization experience -- Notes -- Part V The limits of government regulation -- 14 China's impact on the Global Information Society -- 'Sharing the same bed, but not the same dream' -- The international patchwork -- A different view -- Grasping the pen and the gun -- The Central Propaganda Department -- Bureaucratic rivalries -- Commerce and the Party-state -- Controlling the skies -- Media regulation without law -- Synergies of censorship and copyright -- The audiovisual tide -- The national cable link-up -- Guarding the gateways -- The firewall -- Filtering in, filtering out -- Dilemmas of ownership -- China and the Global Information Society -- Notes -- 15 Freedom versus access rights in a European context
  • Council of Europe: defining pluralism -- Fundamental right to freedom of expression -- European Union (EU) and national pluralism law -- Measures to encourage pluralism -- National rules to prevent vertical integration -- Frequency distribution policies -- A common framework for general authorisations and individual licences in the field of telecommunications services -- Towards a common framework for electronic communications infrastructure and associated services -- Access rights to essential facilities -- Programme requirements -- Programme networking -- Public broadcasting systems -- State aid -- Pluralism in the changing technological and economic environment -- Recent Council of Europe developments on media pluralism and access -- Notes -- 16 Pluralism, guidance and the new media -- Democracy and the media -- Variations on media pluralism -- Media guidance and pluralism -- The implications for new media -- Regulatory possibilities -- 17 Five challenges for regulating the Global Information Society -- Introduction -- Five challenges for policy-makers -- Old law or new law? -- Proportionality -- Flexibility -- Preserving values -- Transnational cooperation -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (388 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780203988893
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2017. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC238749
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL238749
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10094849
  • (OCoLC)936909664
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC238749

Library Locations

  • Architecture LibraryBorrow it
    Gould Hall 830 Van Vleet Oval Rm. 105, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.205706 -97.445050
  • Bizzell Memorial LibraryBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • Boorstin CollectionBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • Chinese Literature Translation ArchiveBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., RM 414, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • Engineering LibraryBorrow it
    Felgar Hall 865 Asp Avenue, Rm. 222, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.205706 -97.445050
  • Fine Arts LibraryBorrow it
    Catlett Music Center 500 West Boyd Street, Rm. 20, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.210371 -97.448244
  • Harry W. Bass Business History CollectionBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Rm. 521NW, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • History of Science CollectionsBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Rm. 521NW, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • John and Mary Nichols Rare Books and Special CollectionsBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Rm. 509NW, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • Library Service CenterBorrow it
    2601 Technology Place, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.185561 -97.398361
  • Price College Digital LibraryBorrow it
    Adams Hall 102 307 West Brooks St., Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.210371 -97.448244
  • Western History CollectionsBorrow it
    Monnet Hall 630 Parrington Oval, Rm. 300, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.209584 -97.445414
Processing Feedback ...