The Resource International Law and Boundary Disputes in Africa

International Law and Boundary Disputes in Africa

Label
International Law and Boundary Disputes in Africa
Title
International Law and Boundary Disputes in Africa
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Oduntan, Gbenga
Dewey number
341.42096
LC call number
KZ3684 -- .O386 2015eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Routledge Research in International Law Ser
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Boundary disputes
Label
International Law and Boundary Disputes in Africa
Link
https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/oulaw/detail.action?docID=3569719
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Table of Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- 1 Africa: Birthing the empire of law and concept of territory -- 1.1 International law and Africa -- 1.1.1 Racialism and European appropriation of the 'common law of mankind' -- 1.1.2 Why the House always wins -- 1.2 Eurocentricity and the applicable international boundary laws -- 2 Sovereignty, jurisdiction, territorial integrity and territorial acquisition in international law -- 2.1 Concept and forms of sovereignty -- 2.2 Globalisation vs territorial sovereignty -- 2.3 Jurisdiction within sovereignty -- 2.4 Westphalian vs indigenous sovereignty -- 2.5 The principle of territorial jurisdiction -- 2.6 Territory and territorial acquisition in public international law and international relations -- 2.6.1 Occupation -- 2.6.2 Cession -- 2.6.3 Accretion, erosion and avulsion -- 2.6.4 Conquest or annexation -- 2.6.5 Prescription -- 2.6.6 Renunciation or relinquishment -- 2.6.7 Adjudication -- 2.6.8 Abandonment and dereliction -- 2.6.9 Discovery -- 2.6.10 Papal grant -- 3 Frontiers and boundaries in the context of international legal framework of territorial sovereignty and jurisdiction -- 3.1 The functionality of frontiers and boundaries -- 3.2 Natural vs artificial boundaries -- 3.3 Frontier vs boundary -- 4 Province of international boundary disputes determined -- 4.1 What are international boundary disputes? -- 4.2 Internal boundary disputes -- 4.3 Territorial vs boundary disputes -- 4.4 Frontiers, borders, fences and walls in law and international relations -- 4.4.1 Boundaries -- 4.4.2 Borders and borderlands -- 4.4.3 Fences and walls -- 4.5 Delimitation and demarcation juxtaposed -- 4.6 African delimitation and demarcation of boundaries in their historical, colonial and contemporary contexts
  • 4.7 High power politics: legality and illegalities of the Berlin Conference (1885) -- 4.8 Classifications and nature of African boundary disputes -- 4.9 Boundaries and disputes: a multidisciplinary approach -- 5 Actual and potential role of the African Union Organisation in boundary dispute management and resolution -- 5.1 African Union early warning system -- 5.2 The African Union Border Programme (AUBP) and the delimitation, demarcation and settlement of African boundary disputes -- 5.2.1 Law practice and diplomacy of the African Union Border Programme -- 5.2.2 Implementation of the African Union Border Programme -- 6 African regional economic communities and the management of boundary disputes -- 6.1 Conflict resolution and management in the East African sub-region (IGAD area) -- 6.1.1 Role of CEWARN in detecting and managing cross-boundary disputes -- 6.1.2 IGAD's relevance in border and boundary disputes -- 6.2 ECOWAS -- 6.2.1 Conflict resolution and management in the West African sub-region: ECOWAS area -- 6.2.2 Rules of the ECOWAS Treaty and Protocols -- 6.2.3 Actual and potential role of the Court of Justice of the Economic Community of West African States -- 6.2.4 ECOWAS Early Warning System -- 6.2.5 ECOWAS experience in boundary disputes -- 6.3 Conflict and dispute management in the Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS) -- 6.3.1 Assessing the early warning capabilities and performance of MARAC -- 6.4 Law and practice of conflict and dispute management in the SADC -- 6.4.1 Political mechanisms for the resolution of boundary disputes in the SADC region -- 7 Manifestations of boundary disputes in the African geopolitical zones -- 7.1 East African boundaries: border disputes -- 7.1.1 Sudan-Kenya: the Ilemi Triangle -- 7.1.2 Kenya-South Sudan (Nadapal boundary) -- 7.1.3 Tanzania-Malawi: Lake Malawi (Nyasa)
  • 7.1.4 Kenya-Uganda: Migingo Island -- 7.1.5 Eritrea-Ethiopia -- 7.1.6 Sudan-South Sudan border disputes -- 7.2 West African boundaries and borders disputes -- 7.2.1 Cameroon-Nigeria: land and maritime dispute -- 7.2.2 Gabon and Equatorial Guinea: territorial disputes on the Island of Mbanié -- 7.2.3 Burkina Faso-Niger frontier dispute -- 7.2.4 Benin-Niger frontier dispute -- 7.3 North Africa: boundary disputes and contested territories -- 7.4 Southern Africa: boundary disputes and contested territories -- 7.4.1 Swaziland-South Africa -- 7.5 Central African states (CEMAC): boundary disputes -- 8 Case study: the arbitral route to settlement of African boundary disputes -- 8.1 The arbitral route: the Eritrea-Ethiopia Boundary Commission Case -- 8.1.1 Synopsis of the Eritrean Case: statement submitted to the EEBC -- 8.2 Synopsis of Ethiopia's statement in accordance with paragraph 4(8) of the Agreement concluded on 12 December 2000 -- 8.2.1 Ethiopia's historical account of the background of the territory -- 8.2.2 Ethiopian view of applicable law -- 8.2.3 Ethiopian view of the methodology: the five sectors -- 8.2.4 The Agreements pre-figuring the Treaties of 1900, 1902 and 1908 -- 8.2.5 Ethiopian view of the pertinent geography -- 8.2.6 Ethiopian view of the changing and opportunistic attitude of Italy during key periods -- 8.2.7 Ethiopia's position -- 8.2.8 The disposition of the Cunama (Sector II) -- 8.2.9 Interpretation and application of the Agreements: Sector III - along the Mareb River from the Mai Ambessa to the Belesa River -- 8.2.10 Interpretation and application of the Agreements: Sector V - from the confluence of the Mareb and Belesa Rivers to the easternmost point defined by the Treaty of 1900 -- 8.2.11 Ethiopian view of the period 1908-present -- 8.2.12 Incidence of disputes between the parties
  • 8.3 Critiquing the EEBC decision and understanding the difficulties of implementation -- 8.4 Eritrea-Ethiopia Claims Commission (EECC) -- 9 Case study: mediation route to settlement: the dispute between Malawi and Tanzania over Lake Nyasa -- 9.1 The applicable treaties and instruments -- 9.2 Malawi's position -- 9.3 Tanzania's position -- 9.4 HLMT: challenges, achievements and prospects -- 10 Case study: adjudicative route - a critique of the land and maritime boundary dispute (Cameroon v Nigeria) -- 10.1 Geophysical setting of the region -- 10.2 Historical provenance of the boundary and territorial problem -- 10.3 The Judgment -- 10.4 The law and diplomacy of the Cameroon-Nigeria Mixed Commission -- 10.5 The structures of diplomacy, administration and implementation -- 10.6 Identifying Eurocentricity in the jurisprudence of the World Court -- 11 Sociology, politics, insecurity and the psychology of power in African boundary relations -- 11.1 Power and political differentials in the diplomacy of African boundary disputes -- 12 Pacific settlement of international boundary disputes: a critical appraisal of the International Court of Justice -- 12.1 Conflict resolution and cooling off mechanism functions of the ICJ in the adjudication of African boundary disputes -- 12.1.1 Diplomatic function of international courts -- 12.1.2 Advancing jurisprudence and elaboration of the law -- 12.2 International adjudication of African boundary disputes: a critical appraisal of the contentious and advisory jurisdiction of the World Court 257 -- 12.3 Role of the International Court of Justice in relation to the struggle for self-determination and independence for the mandate and colonial territories in Africa -- 12.4 Prospects of the African Court of Justice as a preferred option under the adjudication route
  • 12.5 International arbitration of African boundary disputes: a critical appraisal of the Permanent Court of Arbitration -- 12.5.1 Arbitration -- 12.5.2 The Hague Conferences and the Permanent Court of Arbitration -- 12.6 Evaluation of alternative forms of pacific settlement of boundary disputes -- 12.6.1 Negotiation -- 12.6.2 Enquiry -- 12.6.3 Conciliation -- 12.6.4 Good Offices -- 12.6.5 Mediation -- 12.7 Multi-tracking and indigenising settlement of boundary disputes in Africa: a fusion of law, politics and culture -- 12.7.1 Bona fide assisted direct negotiations -- 12.7.2 African mediation -- 12.7.3 The African Conciliation Commission -- 12.7.4 The underdeveloped state of indigenous African adjudication -- 12.8 Factors predictive of the failure of ADR and Tier 2 diplomacy in boundary matters -- 12.8.1 Poor knowledge, incompetence or careless diagnosis of the crisis -- 12.8.2 Poor strategy and/or poorly trained mediators -- 12.8.3 Lack of neutrality/mediators with an interest to serve -- 12.8.4 Unable to stay the course -- 12.9 Identification and evaluation of best practices for pacific settlement of disputes -- 12.9.1 Flexibility -- 12.9.2 Visit to locus -- 12.9.3 Determination of locus standi -- 12.9.4 The interpretative function in boundary dispute resolution -- 12.9.5 Interim measures of protection and control -- 13 Role and scope for involvement of Africa's developed northern partners in the settlement of boundary disputes -- 13.1 Role and scope of involvement of the European Union in African boundary dispute resolution -- 13.2 Role and scope of involvement of the United States in African boundary dispute resolution -- 14 The problem of costs and the relevance of legal aid in African boundary dispute resolution: funding delimitation, demarcation and other implementation activities
  • 15 Settlement of international boundary disputes by use of force
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 online resource (429 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780203776841
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC3569719
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL3569719
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr11069625
  • (CaONFJC)MIL803409
  • (OCoLC)929510545
Label
International Law and Boundary Disputes in Africa
Link
https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/oulaw/detail.action?docID=3569719
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Table of Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- 1 Africa: Birthing the empire of law and concept of territory -- 1.1 International law and Africa -- 1.1.1 Racialism and European appropriation of the 'common law of mankind' -- 1.1.2 Why the House always wins -- 1.2 Eurocentricity and the applicable international boundary laws -- 2 Sovereignty, jurisdiction, territorial integrity and territorial acquisition in international law -- 2.1 Concept and forms of sovereignty -- 2.2 Globalisation vs territorial sovereignty -- 2.3 Jurisdiction within sovereignty -- 2.4 Westphalian vs indigenous sovereignty -- 2.5 The principle of territorial jurisdiction -- 2.6 Territory and territorial acquisition in public international law and international relations -- 2.6.1 Occupation -- 2.6.2 Cession -- 2.6.3 Accretion, erosion and avulsion -- 2.6.4 Conquest or annexation -- 2.6.5 Prescription -- 2.6.6 Renunciation or relinquishment -- 2.6.7 Adjudication -- 2.6.8 Abandonment and dereliction -- 2.6.9 Discovery -- 2.6.10 Papal grant -- 3 Frontiers and boundaries in the context of international legal framework of territorial sovereignty and jurisdiction -- 3.1 The functionality of frontiers and boundaries -- 3.2 Natural vs artificial boundaries -- 3.3 Frontier vs boundary -- 4 Province of international boundary disputes determined -- 4.1 What are international boundary disputes? -- 4.2 Internal boundary disputes -- 4.3 Territorial vs boundary disputes -- 4.4 Frontiers, borders, fences and walls in law and international relations -- 4.4.1 Boundaries -- 4.4.2 Borders and borderlands -- 4.4.3 Fences and walls -- 4.5 Delimitation and demarcation juxtaposed -- 4.6 African delimitation and demarcation of boundaries in their historical, colonial and contemporary contexts
  • 4.7 High power politics: legality and illegalities of the Berlin Conference (1885) -- 4.8 Classifications and nature of African boundary disputes -- 4.9 Boundaries and disputes: a multidisciplinary approach -- 5 Actual and potential role of the African Union Organisation in boundary dispute management and resolution -- 5.1 African Union early warning system -- 5.2 The African Union Border Programme (AUBP) and the delimitation, demarcation and settlement of African boundary disputes -- 5.2.1 Law practice and diplomacy of the African Union Border Programme -- 5.2.2 Implementation of the African Union Border Programme -- 6 African regional economic communities and the management of boundary disputes -- 6.1 Conflict resolution and management in the East African sub-region (IGAD area) -- 6.1.1 Role of CEWARN in detecting and managing cross-boundary disputes -- 6.1.2 IGAD's relevance in border and boundary disputes -- 6.2 ECOWAS -- 6.2.1 Conflict resolution and management in the West African sub-region: ECOWAS area -- 6.2.2 Rules of the ECOWAS Treaty and Protocols -- 6.2.3 Actual and potential role of the Court of Justice of the Economic Community of West African States -- 6.2.4 ECOWAS Early Warning System -- 6.2.5 ECOWAS experience in boundary disputes -- 6.3 Conflict and dispute management in the Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS) -- 6.3.1 Assessing the early warning capabilities and performance of MARAC -- 6.4 Law and practice of conflict and dispute management in the SADC -- 6.4.1 Political mechanisms for the resolution of boundary disputes in the SADC region -- 7 Manifestations of boundary disputes in the African geopolitical zones -- 7.1 East African boundaries: border disputes -- 7.1.1 Sudan-Kenya: the Ilemi Triangle -- 7.1.2 Kenya-South Sudan (Nadapal boundary) -- 7.1.3 Tanzania-Malawi: Lake Malawi (Nyasa)
  • 7.1.4 Kenya-Uganda: Migingo Island -- 7.1.5 Eritrea-Ethiopia -- 7.1.6 Sudan-South Sudan border disputes -- 7.2 West African boundaries and borders disputes -- 7.2.1 Cameroon-Nigeria: land and maritime dispute -- 7.2.2 Gabon and Equatorial Guinea: territorial disputes on the Island of Mbanié -- 7.2.3 Burkina Faso-Niger frontier dispute -- 7.2.4 Benin-Niger frontier dispute -- 7.3 North Africa: boundary disputes and contested territories -- 7.4 Southern Africa: boundary disputes and contested territories -- 7.4.1 Swaziland-South Africa -- 7.5 Central African states (CEMAC): boundary disputes -- 8 Case study: the arbitral route to settlement of African boundary disputes -- 8.1 The arbitral route: the Eritrea-Ethiopia Boundary Commission Case -- 8.1.1 Synopsis of the Eritrean Case: statement submitted to the EEBC -- 8.2 Synopsis of Ethiopia's statement in accordance with paragraph 4(8) of the Agreement concluded on 12 December 2000 -- 8.2.1 Ethiopia's historical account of the background of the territory -- 8.2.2 Ethiopian view of applicable law -- 8.2.3 Ethiopian view of the methodology: the five sectors -- 8.2.4 The Agreements pre-figuring the Treaties of 1900, 1902 and 1908 -- 8.2.5 Ethiopian view of the pertinent geography -- 8.2.6 Ethiopian view of the changing and opportunistic attitude of Italy during key periods -- 8.2.7 Ethiopia's position -- 8.2.8 The disposition of the Cunama (Sector II) -- 8.2.9 Interpretation and application of the Agreements: Sector III - along the Mareb River from the Mai Ambessa to the Belesa River -- 8.2.10 Interpretation and application of the Agreements: Sector V - from the confluence of the Mareb and Belesa Rivers to the easternmost point defined by the Treaty of 1900 -- 8.2.11 Ethiopian view of the period 1908-present -- 8.2.12 Incidence of disputes between the parties
  • 8.3 Critiquing the EEBC decision and understanding the difficulties of implementation -- 8.4 Eritrea-Ethiopia Claims Commission (EECC) -- 9 Case study: mediation route to settlement: the dispute between Malawi and Tanzania over Lake Nyasa -- 9.1 The applicable treaties and instruments -- 9.2 Malawi's position -- 9.3 Tanzania's position -- 9.4 HLMT: challenges, achievements and prospects -- 10 Case study: adjudicative route - a critique of the land and maritime boundary dispute (Cameroon v Nigeria) -- 10.1 Geophysical setting of the region -- 10.2 Historical provenance of the boundary and territorial problem -- 10.3 The Judgment -- 10.4 The law and diplomacy of the Cameroon-Nigeria Mixed Commission -- 10.5 The structures of diplomacy, administration and implementation -- 10.6 Identifying Eurocentricity in the jurisprudence of the World Court -- 11 Sociology, politics, insecurity and the psychology of power in African boundary relations -- 11.1 Power and political differentials in the diplomacy of African boundary disputes -- 12 Pacific settlement of international boundary disputes: a critical appraisal of the International Court of Justice -- 12.1 Conflict resolution and cooling off mechanism functions of the ICJ in the adjudication of African boundary disputes -- 12.1.1 Diplomatic function of international courts -- 12.1.2 Advancing jurisprudence and elaboration of the law -- 12.2 International adjudication of African boundary disputes: a critical appraisal of the contentious and advisory jurisdiction of the World Court 257 -- 12.3 Role of the International Court of Justice in relation to the struggle for self-determination and independence for the mandate and colonial territories in Africa -- 12.4 Prospects of the African Court of Justice as a preferred option under the adjudication route
  • 12.5 International arbitration of African boundary disputes: a critical appraisal of the Permanent Court of Arbitration -- 12.5.1 Arbitration -- 12.5.2 The Hague Conferences and the Permanent Court of Arbitration -- 12.6 Evaluation of alternative forms of pacific settlement of boundary disputes -- 12.6.1 Negotiation -- 12.6.2 Enquiry -- 12.6.3 Conciliation -- 12.6.4 Good Offices -- 12.6.5 Mediation -- 12.7 Multi-tracking and indigenising settlement of boundary disputes in Africa: a fusion of law, politics and culture -- 12.7.1 Bona fide assisted direct negotiations -- 12.7.2 African mediation -- 12.7.3 The African Conciliation Commission -- 12.7.4 The underdeveloped state of indigenous African adjudication -- 12.8 Factors predictive of the failure of ADR and Tier 2 diplomacy in boundary matters -- 12.8.1 Poor knowledge, incompetence or careless diagnosis of the crisis -- 12.8.2 Poor strategy and/or poorly trained mediators -- 12.8.3 Lack of neutrality/mediators with an interest to serve -- 12.8.4 Unable to stay the course -- 12.9 Identification and evaluation of best practices for pacific settlement of disputes -- 12.9.1 Flexibility -- 12.9.2 Visit to locus -- 12.9.3 Determination of locus standi -- 12.9.4 The interpretative function in boundary dispute resolution -- 12.9.5 Interim measures of protection and control -- 13 Role and scope for involvement of Africa's developed northern partners in the settlement of boundary disputes -- 13.1 Role and scope of involvement of the European Union in African boundary dispute resolution -- 13.2 Role and scope of involvement of the United States in African boundary dispute resolution -- 14 The problem of costs and the relevance of legal aid in African boundary dispute resolution: funding delimitation, demarcation and other implementation activities
  • 15 Settlement of international boundary disputes by use of force
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 online resource (429 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780203776841
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC3569719
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL3569719
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr11069625
  • (CaONFJC)MIL803409
  • (OCoLC)929510545

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