The Resource Everett and Webster. : A scene in Congress in 1826! Thirty-three years ago, a New England representative made his first essay in the halls of Congress. ... Who was it that thus bowed himself to the 'strange gods' of the South--the Baal and the Moloch of slavery? Edward Everett, of Massachusetts, who, as governor in 1836--true to his principles--announced in his inaugural message, that the discussion of slavery is an offence indictable at common law! ... And who is now, in strains of fulsome eulogy, commending to your admiration and imitation, Daniel Webster, the shameless defender of the Fugitive Slave Bill .., (electronic resource)

Everett and Webster. : A scene in Congress in 1826! Thirty-three years ago, a New England representative made his first essay in the halls of Congress. ... Who was it that thus bowed himself to the 'strange gods' of the South--the Baal and the Moloch of slavery? Edward Everett, of Massachusetts, who, as governor in 1836--true to his principles--announced in his inaugural message, that the discussion of slavery is an offence indictable at common law! ... And who is now, in strains of fulsome eulogy, commending to your admiration and imitation, Daniel Webster, the shameless defender of the Fugitive Slave Bill .., (electronic resource)

Label
Everett and Webster. : A scene in Congress in 1826! Thirty-three years ago, a New England representative made his first essay in the halls of Congress. ... Who was it that thus bowed himself to the 'strange gods' of the South--the Baal and the Moloch of slavery? Edward Everett, of Massachusetts, who, as governor in 1836--true to his principles--announced in his inaugural message, that the discussion of slavery is an offence indictable at common law! ... And who is now, in strains of fulsome eulogy, commending to your admiration and imitation, Daniel Webster, the shameless defender of the Fugitive Slave Bill ..
Title
Everett and Webster.
Title remainder
A scene in Congress in 1826! Thirty-three years ago, a New England representative made his first essay in the halls of Congress. ... Who was it that thus bowed himself to the 'strange gods' of the South--the Baal and the Moloch of slavery? Edward Everett, of Massachusetts, who, as governor in 1836--true to his principles--announced in his inaugural message, that the discussion of slavery is an offence indictable at common law! ... And who is now, in strains of fulsome eulogy, commending to your admiration and imitation, Daniel Webster, the shameless defender of the Fugitive Slave Bill ..
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MWA
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Massachusetts
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Everett, Edward
  • Webster, Daniel
  • United States.
  • Slavery
Label
Everett and Webster. : A scene in Congress in 1826! Thirty-three years ago, a New England representative made his first essay in the halls of Congress. ... Who was it that thus bowed himself to the 'strange gods' of the South--the Baal and the Moloch of slavery? Edward Everett, of Massachusetts, who, as governor in 1836--true to his principles--announced in his inaugural message, that the discussion of slavery is an offence indictable at common law! ... And who is now, in strains of fulsome eulogy, commending to your admiration and imitation, Daniel Webster, the shameless defender of the Fugitive Slave Bill .., (electronic resource)
Link
http://libraries.ou.edu/access.aspx?url=http://opac.newsbank.com/select/broadsides1/10387
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Followed by: Massachusetts will demand the removal of the statue of the defender of the fugitive slave bill. Sign and circulate the following petition. To the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts: We, the undersigned, citizens of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, respectfully ask you to remove from the State House grounds--as no honor to the state, and repugnant to the moral sentiment of the people--the statue of Daniel Webster, whose last years were spent in defending the fugitive slave bill ..
  • Presumably printed shortly after Webster's statue was inaugurated on September 17, 1859, at which ceremony Edward Everett gave the eulogy of Webster
  • Printed area measures 42.5 x 13.4 cm
Antecedent source
mixed
Color
mixed
Dimensions
46 x 21 cm.
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 sheet ([1] p.)
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
electronic
Level of compression
lossless
Quality assurance targets
absent
Reformatting quality
access
Reproduction note
Electronic text and image data.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • 3534457-01okla_normanlaw
  • (SIRSI)3534457
  • (Sirsi) aas05010387
Label
Everett and Webster. : A scene in Congress in 1826! Thirty-three years ago, a New England representative made his first essay in the halls of Congress. ... Who was it that thus bowed himself to the 'strange gods' of the South--the Baal and the Moloch of slavery? Edward Everett, of Massachusetts, who, as governor in 1836--true to his principles--announced in his inaugural message, that the discussion of slavery is an offence indictable at common law! ... And who is now, in strains of fulsome eulogy, commending to your admiration and imitation, Daniel Webster, the shameless defender of the Fugitive Slave Bill .., (electronic resource)
Link
http://libraries.ou.edu/access.aspx?url=http://opac.newsbank.com/select/broadsides1/10387
Publication
Note
  • Followed by: Massachusetts will demand the removal of the statue of the defender of the fugitive slave bill. Sign and circulate the following petition. To the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts: We, the undersigned, citizens of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, respectfully ask you to remove from the State House grounds--as no honor to the state, and repugnant to the moral sentiment of the people--the statue of Daniel Webster, whose last years were spent in defending the fugitive slave bill ..
  • Presumably printed shortly after Webster's statue was inaugurated on September 17, 1859, at which ceremony Edward Everett gave the eulogy of Webster
  • Printed area measures 42.5 x 13.4 cm
Antecedent source
mixed
Color
mixed
Dimensions
46 x 21 cm.
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 sheet ([1] p.)
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
electronic
Level of compression
lossless
Quality assurance targets
absent
Reformatting quality
access
Reproduction note
Electronic text and image data.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • 3534457-01okla_normanlaw
  • (SIRSI)3534457
  • (Sirsi) aas05010387

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