The Resource Equity and Trusts

Equity and Trusts

Label
Equity and Trusts
Title
Equity and Trusts
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Atkins, Scott
Dewey number
346.42/004
LC call number
KD1480 -- .A855 2016eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Spotlights Ser
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Equity - England
Label
Equity and Trusts
Link
https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/oulaw/detail.action?docID=4218961
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Half title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface to the Second Edition -- Guide to the Spotlights Series -- Guide to the Website -- Table of Cases -- Table of UK Legislation -- Table of Statutory Instruments -- Table of European and International Legislation -- 1 Equity: Its meaning, history and maxims -- As you read -- 1.1 'Equity' - what is it? -- 1.2 Our civil court system in the twenty-first century -- 1.3 History of equity -- 1.3.1 Stepping back in time - the development of the common law -- 1.3.2 Procedural defects with the common law courts -- 1.3.3 The use of juries in deciding facts in an action -- 1.3.4 Stepping back in time - the development of the court of equity -- 1.3.5 Equity's fall from grace -- 1.3.6 Reform of the Court of Chancery - and the triumph of equity -- 1.4 Coming full circle - back to the twenty-first century -- 1.4.1 The fusion debate -- 1.5 Equity's guiding principles - its maxims -- 1.5.1 Equity will not suffer a wrong to be without a remedy -- 1.5.2 Equity follows the law -- 1.5.3 Where there is equal equity, the law shall prevail -- 1.5.4 Where the equities are equal, the first in time shall prevail -- 1.5.5 He who seeks equity must do equity -- 1.5.6 He who comes to equity must come with clean hands -- 1.5.7 Delay defeats equities -- 1.5.8 Equality is equity -- 1.5.9 Equity looks to the intent rather than to the form -- 1.5.10 Equity looks on that as done which ought to be done -- 1.5.11 Equity imputes an intention to fulfil an obligation -- 1.5.12 Equity acts in personam -- Chapter glossary -- Points to review -- Taking it further -- 2 Classification of trusts and powers -- As you read -- 2.1 The trust -- 2.2 Definition -- 2.2.1 The parties typically involved in the creation of an express trust -- 2.3 Where it all began... -- 2.3.1 It may have begun like this...
  • 2.3.2 But it probably began like this... -- 2.3.3 The first use of the trust -- 2.3.4 It may have been a bit of both ... or something else entirely! -- 2.3.5 The social and economic consequences of the early trusts -- 2.4 Split ownership -- 2.5 The different types of trust -- 2.5.1 Express trusts -- 2.5.1.1 The fixed trust -- 2.5.1.2 The discretionary trust -- 2.5.1.3 The protective trust -- 2.5.2 Implied trusts -- 2.5.2.1 The resulting trust -- 2.5.2.2 The constructive trust -- 2.6 What type of property can be left on trust? -- 2.7 The express trust -- 2.7.1 When can express trusts be created? -- 2.7.2 It's not all that straightforward: the different types of equitable interest -- 2.7.3 What are the uses of express trusts? -- 2.7.3.1 Houses -- 2.7.3.2 Pensions -- 2.7.3.3 Charities -- 2.7.3.4 Taxation avoidance -- 2.8 Powers of appointment -- 2.8.1 Trust or power of appointment? -- 2.8.2 What types of powers of appointment can be given to trustees? -- 2.8.3 Types of powers -- 2.8.3.1 General powers of appointment -- 2.8.3.2 Special powers of appointment -- 2.8.3.3 Intermediate/hybrid power of appointment -- 2.8.4 The operation of a power -- Chapter glossary -- Points to review -- Taking it further -- 3 Implied trusts -- As you read -- 3.1 The background to implied trusts -- 3.1.1 The requirement of form -- 3.2 Implied trusts - a definition -- 3.3 The resulting trust -- 3.3.1 Divergence of views of the basis of a resulting trust -- 3.3.2 Category A resulting trusts: from a voluntary transfer -- 3.3.2.1 The presumption of advancement -- 3.3.3 Category B resulting trusts: created where the entire equitable interest is not exhausted -- 3.3.3.1 Category B: where the settlor makes an error -- 3.3.3.2 Category B: where a condition to the operation of the trust has come to an end -- 3.4 The constructive trust
  • 3.4.1 The two types of constructive trust: why can it matter? -- 3.4.1.1 Constructive trust - where one party is the legal owner of the property -- 3.4.1.2 Constructive trust - from where equity will not suffer a wrong to be without a remedy -- 3.4.2 The constructive trust as a remedial device -- Chapter glossary -- Points to review -- Taking it further -- 4 Trust formation: Capacity and formalities -- As you read -- 4.1 The fundamental requirements needed to form an express trust -- 4.1.1 The settlor transfers the entire ownership in the trust property to a trustee -- 4.1.1.1 Formal requirements -- 4.1.1.2 The three certainties -- 4.1.1.3 The beneficiary principle -- 4.1.1.4 The rules against perpetuity -- 4.1.2 The trustee holds the property on behalf of the beneficiary -- 4.2 Trust property -- 4.3 Capacity -- 4.3.1 Capacity of the settlor -- 4.3.1.1 Children -- 4.3.1.2 Mentally incapacitated individuals -- 4.3.2 Capacity of the trustee(s) -- 4.3.2.1 Children as trustees -- 4.3.2.2 Trust corporations -- 4.3.2.3 Member-nominated trustees -- 4.3.3 Capacity of the beneficiaries -- 4.4 Formalities -- 4.5 Formality requirements on the declaration of a trust -- 4.5.1 Summary of the main principles of section 53(1)(b) Law of Property Act 1925 -- 4.6 Formality requirements on the disposition of an equitable interest -- 4.6.1 Where the beneficiary asks the trustee to hold their equitable interest for another person -- 4.6.1.1 The literal view: Grey v Inland Revenue Commissioners -- 4.6.1.2 A potential shift away from the literal view: Oughtred v Inland Revenue Commissioners -- 4.6.1.3 The minority's view given credence: Re Holt's Settlement -- 4.6.1.4 A more modern view on the relationship between section 53(1)(c) and section 53(2) -- 4.6.1.5 Where the legal estate is transferred from one trustee to another recipient: does section 53(1)(c) apply?
  • 4.6.1.6 Where the beneficiary declares a trust: does section 53(1)(b) or 53(1)(c) apply? -- 4.6.2 Summary of the main principles of section 53(1)(c) Law of Property Act 1925 -- Chapter glossary -- Points to review -- Taking it further -- 5 Trust formation: The three certainties -- As you read -- 5.1 Formation of an express trust -- 5.2 The three certainties -- 5.2.1 The basics... -- 5.2.2 Why does English law insist on the need for the three certainties? -- 5.3 Certainty of intention -- 5.3.1 No special words have to be used to display intention -- 5.3.2 But 'precatory' (or 'begging') words do not create a trust -- 5.3.3 Actions can speak as loud as words -- 5.3.4 Certainty of intention in trusts involving businesses -- 5.3.5 The consequence if certainty of intention is missing -- 5.4 Certainty of subject matter -- 5.4.1 Identification of the trust property -- 5.4.2 Identification of the beneficial interests -- 5.4.3 The consequence if certainty of subject matter is absent -- 5.5 Certainty of object -- 5.6 Certainty of object in fixed trusts -- 5.6.1 The concept of a list -- 5.6.2 The list need not be absolutely definitive -- 5.6.3 Untraceable beneficiaries in a fixed trust -- 5.7 Certainty of object in discretionary trusts -- 5.7.1 Why is a power of appointment different to a discretionary trust? -- 5.7.2 The position with discretionary trusts and powers at the end of the 1960s -- 5.7.3 The House of Lords takes stock... -- 5.7.3.1 Re Baden's Deed Trusts (No. 2) - the sequel ... -- 5.7.4 Final note - a cautionary case... -- Points to review -- Taking it further -- 6 Trust formation: The beneficiary principle -- As you read -- 6.1 Definition of the beneficiary principle -- 6.1.1 Rationale of the beneficiary principle -- 6.2 Exceptions to the beneficiary principle -- 6.2.1 Charitable trusts -- 6.2.2 Trusts of imperfect obligation
  • 6.2.2.1 Trusts relating to tombs and monuments -- 6.2.2.2 Trusts for the provision of masses in private -- 6.2.2.3 Trusts to benefit a specific animal -- 6.2.2.4 Other categories of trust of imperfect obligation? -- 6.2.3 Purpose trusts but that nonetheless have ascertainable beneficiaries -- 6.2.4 Offshore trusts -- 6.2.5 Unincorporated associations -- 6.2.6 Dissolution of an unincorporated association -- 6.2.6.1 Donations primarily by non-members -- 6.2.6.2 Donations by both members and non-members -- 6.2.6.3 Summary -- Points to review -- Taking it further -- 7 Constitution of a trust -- As you read -- 7.1 Constituting the trust and the relationship with creating a trust -- 7.2 Constitution of a trust -- 7.2.1 The relationship between a gift and a trust -- 7.3 How a trust is completely constituted -- 7.3.1 Transfer of legal ownership to a trustee -- 7.3.1.1 Where the trust property is vested in the trustee by circumstance -- 7.3.1.2 The rule in Strong v Bird -- 7.3.1.3 Donatio mortis causa -- 7.3.2 Retention of the legal ownership in the trust property where the settlor declares that he himself is the trustee -- 7.3.2.1 Self-declaration by an individual -- 7.3.2.2 Self-declaration by a business -- 7.4 When a trust is completely constituted -- As you read -- 7.4.1 The original test - has the settlor done 'everything necessary' to constitute the trust? -- 7.4.2 The changing concept of 'everything necessary' -- 7.4.3 The beginnings of equity's interventionist approach: a new test based on 'conscience' -- 7.4.4 Equity's interventionist approach taken further: the key case of Pennington v Waine -- 7.4.5 Summary of when a gift will be perfect -- Chapter glossary -- Points to review -- Taking it further -- 8 Trustees' appointment and removal -- trustees' fiduciary duties -- As you read -- 8.1 Role of a trustee -- 8.2 Appointment of trustees
  • 8.2.1 Appointment by the settlor
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
2nd ed.
Extent
1 online resource (784 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781317569831
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC4218961
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL4218961
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr11136869
  • (CaONFJC)MIL882827
  • (OCoLC)933442266
Label
Equity and Trusts
Link
https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/oulaw/detail.action?docID=4218961
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Half title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface to the Second Edition -- Guide to the Spotlights Series -- Guide to the Website -- Table of Cases -- Table of UK Legislation -- Table of Statutory Instruments -- Table of European and International Legislation -- 1 Equity: Its meaning, history and maxims -- As you read -- 1.1 'Equity' - what is it? -- 1.2 Our civil court system in the twenty-first century -- 1.3 History of equity -- 1.3.1 Stepping back in time - the development of the common law -- 1.3.2 Procedural defects with the common law courts -- 1.3.3 The use of juries in deciding facts in an action -- 1.3.4 Stepping back in time - the development of the court of equity -- 1.3.5 Equity's fall from grace -- 1.3.6 Reform of the Court of Chancery - and the triumph of equity -- 1.4 Coming full circle - back to the twenty-first century -- 1.4.1 The fusion debate -- 1.5 Equity's guiding principles - its maxims -- 1.5.1 Equity will not suffer a wrong to be without a remedy -- 1.5.2 Equity follows the law -- 1.5.3 Where there is equal equity, the law shall prevail -- 1.5.4 Where the equities are equal, the first in time shall prevail -- 1.5.5 He who seeks equity must do equity -- 1.5.6 He who comes to equity must come with clean hands -- 1.5.7 Delay defeats equities -- 1.5.8 Equality is equity -- 1.5.9 Equity looks to the intent rather than to the form -- 1.5.10 Equity looks on that as done which ought to be done -- 1.5.11 Equity imputes an intention to fulfil an obligation -- 1.5.12 Equity acts in personam -- Chapter glossary -- Points to review -- Taking it further -- 2 Classification of trusts and powers -- As you read -- 2.1 The trust -- 2.2 Definition -- 2.2.1 The parties typically involved in the creation of an express trust -- 2.3 Where it all began... -- 2.3.1 It may have begun like this...
  • 2.3.2 But it probably began like this... -- 2.3.3 The first use of the trust -- 2.3.4 It may have been a bit of both ... or something else entirely! -- 2.3.5 The social and economic consequences of the early trusts -- 2.4 Split ownership -- 2.5 The different types of trust -- 2.5.1 Express trusts -- 2.5.1.1 The fixed trust -- 2.5.1.2 The discretionary trust -- 2.5.1.3 The protective trust -- 2.5.2 Implied trusts -- 2.5.2.1 The resulting trust -- 2.5.2.2 The constructive trust -- 2.6 What type of property can be left on trust? -- 2.7 The express trust -- 2.7.1 When can express trusts be created? -- 2.7.2 It's not all that straightforward: the different types of equitable interest -- 2.7.3 What are the uses of express trusts? -- 2.7.3.1 Houses -- 2.7.3.2 Pensions -- 2.7.3.3 Charities -- 2.7.3.4 Taxation avoidance -- 2.8 Powers of appointment -- 2.8.1 Trust or power of appointment? -- 2.8.2 What types of powers of appointment can be given to trustees? -- 2.8.3 Types of powers -- 2.8.3.1 General powers of appointment -- 2.8.3.2 Special powers of appointment -- 2.8.3.3 Intermediate/hybrid power of appointment -- 2.8.4 The operation of a power -- Chapter glossary -- Points to review -- Taking it further -- 3 Implied trusts -- As you read -- 3.1 The background to implied trusts -- 3.1.1 The requirement of form -- 3.2 Implied trusts - a definition -- 3.3 The resulting trust -- 3.3.1 Divergence of views of the basis of a resulting trust -- 3.3.2 Category A resulting trusts: from a voluntary transfer -- 3.3.2.1 The presumption of advancement -- 3.3.3 Category B resulting trusts: created where the entire equitable interest is not exhausted -- 3.3.3.1 Category B: where the settlor makes an error -- 3.3.3.2 Category B: where a condition to the operation of the trust has come to an end -- 3.4 The constructive trust
  • 3.4.1 The two types of constructive trust: why can it matter? -- 3.4.1.1 Constructive trust - where one party is the legal owner of the property -- 3.4.1.2 Constructive trust - from where equity will not suffer a wrong to be without a remedy -- 3.4.2 The constructive trust as a remedial device -- Chapter glossary -- Points to review -- Taking it further -- 4 Trust formation: Capacity and formalities -- As you read -- 4.1 The fundamental requirements needed to form an express trust -- 4.1.1 The settlor transfers the entire ownership in the trust property to a trustee -- 4.1.1.1 Formal requirements -- 4.1.1.2 The three certainties -- 4.1.1.3 The beneficiary principle -- 4.1.1.4 The rules against perpetuity -- 4.1.2 The trustee holds the property on behalf of the beneficiary -- 4.2 Trust property -- 4.3 Capacity -- 4.3.1 Capacity of the settlor -- 4.3.1.1 Children -- 4.3.1.2 Mentally incapacitated individuals -- 4.3.2 Capacity of the trustee(s) -- 4.3.2.1 Children as trustees -- 4.3.2.2 Trust corporations -- 4.3.2.3 Member-nominated trustees -- 4.3.3 Capacity of the beneficiaries -- 4.4 Formalities -- 4.5 Formality requirements on the declaration of a trust -- 4.5.1 Summary of the main principles of section 53(1)(b) Law of Property Act 1925 -- 4.6 Formality requirements on the disposition of an equitable interest -- 4.6.1 Where the beneficiary asks the trustee to hold their equitable interest for another person -- 4.6.1.1 The literal view: Grey v Inland Revenue Commissioners -- 4.6.1.2 A potential shift away from the literal view: Oughtred v Inland Revenue Commissioners -- 4.6.1.3 The minority's view given credence: Re Holt's Settlement -- 4.6.1.4 A more modern view on the relationship between section 53(1)(c) and section 53(2) -- 4.6.1.5 Where the legal estate is transferred from one trustee to another recipient: does section 53(1)(c) apply?
  • 4.6.1.6 Where the beneficiary declares a trust: does section 53(1)(b) or 53(1)(c) apply? -- 4.6.2 Summary of the main principles of section 53(1)(c) Law of Property Act 1925 -- Chapter glossary -- Points to review -- Taking it further -- 5 Trust formation: The three certainties -- As you read -- 5.1 Formation of an express trust -- 5.2 The three certainties -- 5.2.1 The basics... -- 5.2.2 Why does English law insist on the need for the three certainties? -- 5.3 Certainty of intention -- 5.3.1 No special words have to be used to display intention -- 5.3.2 But 'precatory' (or 'begging') words do not create a trust -- 5.3.3 Actions can speak as loud as words -- 5.3.4 Certainty of intention in trusts involving businesses -- 5.3.5 The consequence if certainty of intention is missing -- 5.4 Certainty of subject matter -- 5.4.1 Identification of the trust property -- 5.4.2 Identification of the beneficial interests -- 5.4.3 The consequence if certainty of subject matter is absent -- 5.5 Certainty of object -- 5.6 Certainty of object in fixed trusts -- 5.6.1 The concept of a list -- 5.6.2 The list need not be absolutely definitive -- 5.6.3 Untraceable beneficiaries in a fixed trust -- 5.7 Certainty of object in discretionary trusts -- 5.7.1 Why is a power of appointment different to a discretionary trust? -- 5.7.2 The position with discretionary trusts and powers at the end of the 1960s -- 5.7.3 The House of Lords takes stock... -- 5.7.3.1 Re Baden's Deed Trusts (No. 2) - the sequel ... -- 5.7.4 Final note - a cautionary case... -- Points to review -- Taking it further -- 6 Trust formation: The beneficiary principle -- As you read -- 6.1 Definition of the beneficiary principle -- 6.1.1 Rationale of the beneficiary principle -- 6.2 Exceptions to the beneficiary principle -- 6.2.1 Charitable trusts -- 6.2.2 Trusts of imperfect obligation
  • 6.2.2.1 Trusts relating to tombs and monuments -- 6.2.2.2 Trusts for the provision of masses in private -- 6.2.2.3 Trusts to benefit a specific animal -- 6.2.2.4 Other categories of trust of imperfect obligation? -- 6.2.3 Purpose trusts but that nonetheless have ascertainable beneficiaries -- 6.2.4 Offshore trusts -- 6.2.5 Unincorporated associations -- 6.2.6 Dissolution of an unincorporated association -- 6.2.6.1 Donations primarily by non-members -- 6.2.6.2 Donations by both members and non-members -- 6.2.6.3 Summary -- Points to review -- Taking it further -- 7 Constitution of a trust -- As you read -- 7.1 Constituting the trust and the relationship with creating a trust -- 7.2 Constitution of a trust -- 7.2.1 The relationship between a gift and a trust -- 7.3 How a trust is completely constituted -- 7.3.1 Transfer of legal ownership to a trustee -- 7.3.1.1 Where the trust property is vested in the trustee by circumstance -- 7.3.1.2 The rule in Strong v Bird -- 7.3.1.3 Donatio mortis causa -- 7.3.2 Retention of the legal ownership in the trust property where the settlor declares that he himself is the trustee -- 7.3.2.1 Self-declaration by an individual -- 7.3.2.2 Self-declaration by a business -- 7.4 When a trust is completely constituted -- As you read -- 7.4.1 The original test - has the settlor done 'everything necessary' to constitute the trust? -- 7.4.2 The changing concept of 'everything necessary' -- 7.4.3 The beginnings of equity's interventionist approach: a new test based on 'conscience' -- 7.4.4 Equity's interventionist approach taken further: the key case of Pennington v Waine -- 7.4.5 Summary of when a gift will be perfect -- Chapter glossary -- Points to review -- Taking it further -- 8 Trustees' appointment and removal -- trustees' fiduciary duties -- As you read -- 8.1 Role of a trustee -- 8.2 Appointment of trustees
  • 8.2.1 Appointment by the settlor
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
2nd ed.
Extent
1 online resource (784 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781317569831
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC4218961
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL4218961
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr11136869
  • (CaONFJC)MIL882827
  • (OCoLC)933442266

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