The Resource Corporations and International Lawmaking

Corporations and International Lawmaking

Label
Corporations and International Lawmaking
Title
Corporations and International Lawmaking
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
No one involved in international trade or environmental activism can afford to ignore this vital publication. The information it provides (on WTO jurisprudence, on current and pending environmental initiatives, on the science behind the disputes), no less than the fresh and convincing analysis it holds forth, make it an essential tool for understanding some of the most crucial issues in international law today
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Tully, Stephen
Dewey number
341
LC call number
KZ1293.T85 2007
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • International business enterprises
  • International law
  • Legislation
  • Pressure groups
  • Soft law
  • Treaties
Label
Corporations and International Lawmaking
Link
https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/oulaw/detail.action?docID=468463
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Table of Contents -- Acknowledgments -- About the Author -- List of Abbreviations -- Chapter 1: Introduction -- A. Terminology -- B. International Law, Governments and Non-State Actors -- C. Corporate Contributions to "Better Lawmaking" -- D. Competence and Authority of Non-State Actors in International Lawmaking -- E. Right and Responsibility of Governments to Regulate -- F. Outline of Structure and Content -- Chapter 2: Historical Perspective on Corporate Participation Within the International Legal Order -- A. Early Commercial Activity and an Emerging Nation State -- B. Chartered Trading Companies and the Extension of Colonial Empire -- 1. Exercising Governmental Powers and Establishing States -- C. Corporate Consolidation and the Emergence of American Multinationals -- 1. Emergence of the International Chamber of Commerce and Intergovernmental Organizations -- 2. Extending U.S. Hegemony and Domestic Concern for Corporate Power -- 3. Historical Observations on the Relationship Between Commercial and Political Actors Within the International Legal Order -- D. Corporate Confrontation and Collaboration with the United Nations -- 1. Intergovernmental Regulatory Initiatives and the U.N. Code of Conduct on Transnational Corporations -- 2. Agenda 21 and Non-State Actor Inclusion Within Intergovernmental Decisionmaking -- 3. Novel Forms of Global Governance and the Global Compact -- 4. Public-Private Partnerships and the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development -- E. Contemporary Modalities for Corporate Participation Within the U.N. System -- 1. Non-State Actor Relations with U.N. Organs and Specialized Agencies -- 2. Non-State Actor Relations with International Economic Institutions -- 3. Ambit of Corporate Relationships with the United Nations: Examples of Standardsetting, Program Implementation and Public Procurement
  • 4. Efforts to Harmonize Secretariat Practices in Their Operational Dealings with Corporations -- 5. Observations on the U.N.'s Relationship with Corporations -- F. Conclusions -- Chapter 3: Corporate Contributions to Customary International Law and "Soft" International Law -- A. Corporate Role in Customary International Law -- 1. Normative Creation -- a. Normative Affirmation: Contractual Principles -- b. Accretions to Existing Customary Rules: Corporate (Non-)Intervention in the Internal Affairs of States -- 2. Implementing and Applying Customary Norms -- a. Foreign Direct Investment as an Inducement to National Standardsetting -- b. Corporations as Conduits for National Standards -- c. Commercial Roles when Implementing Human Rights Standards and the Regulatory Responsibilities of Government -- d. Resisting Prohibitions Under Customary International Law: Illustration of South African Apartheid -- 3. Challenging Norms that Maintain International Legal Order: Prohibition on the Use of Force -- B. Corporate Participation in Developing "Soft" Legal Instruments -- 1. Corporate Participation in Intergovernmental Codes of Conduct -- a. Interpretative Function and Institutional Oversight Responsibility -- b. Maintaining Corporate Compliance Through Continuous Review -- c. Impact of Intergovernmental Codes on Corporate Behavior: Towards Human Rights Norms for Business -- 2. Corporate Standardsetting Activity -- a. International Organization for Standardization -- b. Corporate Voluntary Initiatives as an International Legal Process -- c. Corporate Voluntary Initiatives as Platforms for Influencing Regulation -- C. Conclusions -- Chapter 4: Corporate Contributions to Treaty Formation and Implementation -- A. Illustrations of Corporate Participation in Treaty Negotiations -- 1. Law of the Sea -- 2. Convention on Biological Diversity -- 3. Chemical Weapons
  • 4. International Trade Agreements -- 5. Investment Protection Agreements -- 6. Bribing Foreign Government Officials -- 7. Anti-Competitive Behavior -- 8. Tobacco Advertising -- 9. Observations -- B. Corporate Contributions to Protecting the Ozone Layer and Preventing Climate Change -- 1. Ozone Layer Protection as a Transatlantic Commercial Dispute -- 2. Climate Change and Facilitating Corporate Adaptation -- 3. Technology Transfer and the Position of Developing States -- 4. Corporate Contributions to a Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC -- a. Principal Actors -- i. International Chamber of Commerce -- ii. Trade Associations -- iii. Corporate Coalitions -- b. Principal Activities -- i. Access to Meetings -- ii. Assisting Oral Interventions by Governments -- iii. Oral Interventions by Non-State Actors at the Conclusion of Plenary Sessions -- iv. Membership of and Advice to National Delegations -- v. BINGO Meetings -- vi. Roundtables -- vii. Workshops -- viii. Information Gathering -- ix. Information Dissemination -- x. Influencing Decisionmaking Under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) -- xi. Furthering Emissions Trading -- xii. Continuing the Technological Development Debate -- xiii. Providing Assurances of Compliance -- xiv. Supporting the UNFCCC Secretariat -- xv. Organizing Side Events -- xvi. Informal Activities -- 5. Corporate Attempts to Influence the Participatory Conditions -- C. Role of Non-State Actors in Defining Their Participatory Modalities -- 1. International Conferences Under U.N. Auspices and World Summits -- a. Environmental Protection and Sustainable Development -- b. International Protection of Human Rights -- 2. U.N. General Assembly Special Sessions -- D. Procedural Rules Applicable to U.N. Conferences -- 1. Prior Accreditation Procedures -- 2. Procedural Rules -- a. Oral Interventions -- b. Written Submissions
  • 3. Emergent Right for Non-State Actors to Participate at Intergovernmental Conferences -- a. Scope and Content of an Emergent Right of Participation for Non-State Actors -- E. Corporate Impact on Intergovernmental Treaty Negotiations -- 1. Motivations for Corporate Participation -- 2. Procedural Challenges for Business Engagement -- 3. Assessing Corporate Influences on Substantive Outcomes -- F. Corporate Contributions to Treaty Implementation -- G. Conclusions -- Chapter 5: Corporations and International Dispute Settlement -- A. Corporate Enforcement Function: Self-Interested and Selective -- B. Range of Dispute Resolution Models Available to Corporations -- 1. Recourse to National Courts: South African Pharmaceutical Litigation -- 2. Diplomatic Protection Model -- a. Authoritatively Establishing Property Rights Through the International Court of Justice -- b. Removing Trade Impediments Through the World Trade Organization -- i. Corporate Perspectives and the Amicus Brief Controversy -- ii. Assessment of Corporate Participation Within the WTO -- c. Limitations of the Diplomatic Protection Model -- 3. Direct Arbitral Action Against Governments to Protect Property Rights -- a. Bilateral Investment Treaties and ICSID -- b. North American Free Trade Agreement -- i. Chapter 11 (Investor-Government Dispute Settlement Concerning Property Rghts) -- ii. Amicus Curiae Submissions Under Chapter 11 -- iii. Chapter 19 (Review of Final Anti-Dumping and Countervailing Duty Determinations) -- iv. Chapter 20 (Intergovernmental Dispute Settlement) -- v. Environmental and Labor Cooperation Side Agreements -- vi. Observations on Corporate Contributions Under NAFTA -- 4. Enforcement Within the Operational Framework of Intergovernmental Organizations -- a. Enforcing Unilateral and Multilateral Economic Sanctions
  • b. Initiating Claims Before the U.N. Compensation Commission -- c. Enforcing Labor and Environmental Standards -- 5. Prospects for Enforcement Within the Private Sphere -- C. Corporate Forum Shopping and Proliferating International Tribunals -- D. Characterizing Corporate Roles: Dismantling Legislation, Constraining National Regulatory Capacity or Action Incidental to Regulatory Evolution? -- E. Conclusions -- Chapter 6: Conclusions -- A. Assessment of Corporate Contributions to International Lawmaking -- 1. Assessing the Arguments for and Against Corporate Participation -- 2. Commercial Practices and International Regulatory Development -- 3. Evidence of Corporate Consciousness Within International Legal Processes -- B. Position of Corporations Within the International Legal Order -- 1. Terms of Non-State Actor Participation in International Lawmaking -- 2. Non-State Actor Contributions to (Un)democratic International Legal Processes -- 3. Corporate Relationships with NGOs and Developing Country Governments -- C. Corporate Roles and Regulatory Lacunae -- D. Final Remarks -- Annexes -- A. Procedural Rules for U.N. Organs -- B. Illustrations from Intergovernmental Organizations -- C. Comparative Table of Information Required for Accreditation -- D. Accreditation Procedures to U.N. Conferences -- E. Procedural Rules for Conferences of the Parties (COPs) and Other Governing Bodies for International Environmental Treaties -- F. Comparative Rules of Procedure Defining the Modalities for NGO Participation at U.N. Conferences, World Summits and U.N. General Assembly Special Sessions -- G. Modalities for NGO Participation in the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change -- H. Proposal by Business for a Business Consultative Mechanism -- I. The WTO's Treatment of Amicus Briefs Submitted by Industry
  • J. Proposed Amendments to the WTO Dispute Settlement Understanding
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 online resource (528 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789047440055
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC468463
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL468463
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10355164
  • (CaONFJC)MIL239624
  • (OCoLC)567805756
Label
Corporations and International Lawmaking
Link
https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/oulaw/detail.action?docID=468463
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Table of Contents -- Acknowledgments -- About the Author -- List of Abbreviations -- Chapter 1: Introduction -- A. Terminology -- B. International Law, Governments and Non-State Actors -- C. Corporate Contributions to "Better Lawmaking" -- D. Competence and Authority of Non-State Actors in International Lawmaking -- E. Right and Responsibility of Governments to Regulate -- F. Outline of Structure and Content -- Chapter 2: Historical Perspective on Corporate Participation Within the International Legal Order -- A. Early Commercial Activity and an Emerging Nation State -- B. Chartered Trading Companies and the Extension of Colonial Empire -- 1. Exercising Governmental Powers and Establishing States -- C. Corporate Consolidation and the Emergence of American Multinationals -- 1. Emergence of the International Chamber of Commerce and Intergovernmental Organizations -- 2. Extending U.S. Hegemony and Domestic Concern for Corporate Power -- 3. Historical Observations on the Relationship Between Commercial and Political Actors Within the International Legal Order -- D. Corporate Confrontation and Collaboration with the United Nations -- 1. Intergovernmental Regulatory Initiatives and the U.N. Code of Conduct on Transnational Corporations -- 2. Agenda 21 and Non-State Actor Inclusion Within Intergovernmental Decisionmaking -- 3. Novel Forms of Global Governance and the Global Compact -- 4. Public-Private Partnerships and the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development -- E. Contemporary Modalities for Corporate Participation Within the U.N. System -- 1. Non-State Actor Relations with U.N. Organs and Specialized Agencies -- 2. Non-State Actor Relations with International Economic Institutions -- 3. Ambit of Corporate Relationships with the United Nations: Examples of Standardsetting, Program Implementation and Public Procurement
  • 4. Efforts to Harmonize Secretariat Practices in Their Operational Dealings with Corporations -- 5. Observations on the U.N.'s Relationship with Corporations -- F. Conclusions -- Chapter 3: Corporate Contributions to Customary International Law and "Soft" International Law -- A. Corporate Role in Customary International Law -- 1. Normative Creation -- a. Normative Affirmation: Contractual Principles -- b. Accretions to Existing Customary Rules: Corporate (Non-)Intervention in the Internal Affairs of States -- 2. Implementing and Applying Customary Norms -- a. Foreign Direct Investment as an Inducement to National Standardsetting -- b. Corporations as Conduits for National Standards -- c. Commercial Roles when Implementing Human Rights Standards and the Regulatory Responsibilities of Government -- d. Resisting Prohibitions Under Customary International Law: Illustration of South African Apartheid -- 3. Challenging Norms that Maintain International Legal Order: Prohibition on the Use of Force -- B. Corporate Participation in Developing "Soft" Legal Instruments -- 1. Corporate Participation in Intergovernmental Codes of Conduct -- a. Interpretative Function and Institutional Oversight Responsibility -- b. Maintaining Corporate Compliance Through Continuous Review -- c. Impact of Intergovernmental Codes on Corporate Behavior: Towards Human Rights Norms for Business -- 2. Corporate Standardsetting Activity -- a. International Organization for Standardization -- b. Corporate Voluntary Initiatives as an International Legal Process -- c. Corporate Voluntary Initiatives as Platforms for Influencing Regulation -- C. Conclusions -- Chapter 4: Corporate Contributions to Treaty Formation and Implementation -- A. Illustrations of Corporate Participation in Treaty Negotiations -- 1. Law of the Sea -- 2. Convention on Biological Diversity -- 3. Chemical Weapons
  • 4. International Trade Agreements -- 5. Investment Protection Agreements -- 6. Bribing Foreign Government Officials -- 7. Anti-Competitive Behavior -- 8. Tobacco Advertising -- 9. Observations -- B. Corporate Contributions to Protecting the Ozone Layer and Preventing Climate Change -- 1. Ozone Layer Protection as a Transatlantic Commercial Dispute -- 2. Climate Change and Facilitating Corporate Adaptation -- 3. Technology Transfer and the Position of Developing States -- 4. Corporate Contributions to a Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC -- a. Principal Actors -- i. International Chamber of Commerce -- ii. Trade Associations -- iii. Corporate Coalitions -- b. Principal Activities -- i. Access to Meetings -- ii. Assisting Oral Interventions by Governments -- iii. Oral Interventions by Non-State Actors at the Conclusion of Plenary Sessions -- iv. Membership of and Advice to National Delegations -- v. BINGO Meetings -- vi. Roundtables -- vii. Workshops -- viii. Information Gathering -- ix. Information Dissemination -- x. Influencing Decisionmaking Under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) -- xi. Furthering Emissions Trading -- xii. Continuing the Technological Development Debate -- xiii. Providing Assurances of Compliance -- xiv. Supporting the UNFCCC Secretariat -- xv. Organizing Side Events -- xvi. Informal Activities -- 5. Corporate Attempts to Influence the Participatory Conditions -- C. Role of Non-State Actors in Defining Their Participatory Modalities -- 1. International Conferences Under U.N. Auspices and World Summits -- a. Environmental Protection and Sustainable Development -- b. International Protection of Human Rights -- 2. U.N. General Assembly Special Sessions -- D. Procedural Rules Applicable to U.N. Conferences -- 1. Prior Accreditation Procedures -- 2. Procedural Rules -- a. Oral Interventions -- b. Written Submissions
  • 3. Emergent Right for Non-State Actors to Participate at Intergovernmental Conferences -- a. Scope and Content of an Emergent Right of Participation for Non-State Actors -- E. Corporate Impact on Intergovernmental Treaty Negotiations -- 1. Motivations for Corporate Participation -- 2. Procedural Challenges for Business Engagement -- 3. Assessing Corporate Influences on Substantive Outcomes -- F. Corporate Contributions to Treaty Implementation -- G. Conclusions -- Chapter 5: Corporations and International Dispute Settlement -- A. Corporate Enforcement Function: Self-Interested and Selective -- B. Range of Dispute Resolution Models Available to Corporations -- 1. Recourse to National Courts: South African Pharmaceutical Litigation -- 2. Diplomatic Protection Model -- a. Authoritatively Establishing Property Rights Through the International Court of Justice -- b. Removing Trade Impediments Through the World Trade Organization -- i. Corporate Perspectives and the Amicus Brief Controversy -- ii. Assessment of Corporate Participation Within the WTO -- c. Limitations of the Diplomatic Protection Model -- 3. Direct Arbitral Action Against Governments to Protect Property Rights -- a. Bilateral Investment Treaties and ICSID -- b. North American Free Trade Agreement -- i. Chapter 11 (Investor-Government Dispute Settlement Concerning Property Rghts) -- ii. Amicus Curiae Submissions Under Chapter 11 -- iii. Chapter 19 (Review of Final Anti-Dumping and Countervailing Duty Determinations) -- iv. Chapter 20 (Intergovernmental Dispute Settlement) -- v. Environmental and Labor Cooperation Side Agreements -- vi. Observations on Corporate Contributions Under NAFTA -- 4. Enforcement Within the Operational Framework of Intergovernmental Organizations -- a. Enforcing Unilateral and Multilateral Economic Sanctions
  • b. Initiating Claims Before the U.N. Compensation Commission -- c. Enforcing Labor and Environmental Standards -- 5. Prospects for Enforcement Within the Private Sphere -- C. Corporate Forum Shopping and Proliferating International Tribunals -- D. Characterizing Corporate Roles: Dismantling Legislation, Constraining National Regulatory Capacity or Action Incidental to Regulatory Evolution? -- E. Conclusions -- Chapter 6: Conclusions -- A. Assessment of Corporate Contributions to International Lawmaking -- 1. Assessing the Arguments for and Against Corporate Participation -- 2. Commercial Practices and International Regulatory Development -- 3. Evidence of Corporate Consciousness Within International Legal Processes -- B. Position of Corporations Within the International Legal Order -- 1. Terms of Non-State Actor Participation in International Lawmaking -- 2. Non-State Actor Contributions to (Un)democratic International Legal Processes -- 3. Corporate Relationships with NGOs and Developing Country Governments -- C. Corporate Roles and Regulatory Lacunae -- D. Final Remarks -- Annexes -- A. Procedural Rules for U.N. Organs -- B. Illustrations from Intergovernmental Organizations -- C. Comparative Table of Information Required for Accreditation -- D. Accreditation Procedures to U.N. Conferences -- E. Procedural Rules for Conferences of the Parties (COPs) and Other Governing Bodies for International Environmental Treaties -- F. Comparative Rules of Procedure Defining the Modalities for NGO Participation at U.N. Conferences, World Summits and U.N. General Assembly Special Sessions -- G. Modalities for NGO Participation in the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change -- H. Proposal by Business for a Business Consultative Mechanism -- I. The WTO's Treatment of Amicus Briefs Submitted by Industry
  • J. Proposed Amendments to the WTO Dispute Settlement Understanding
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 online resource (528 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789047440055
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC468463
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL468463
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10355164
  • (CaONFJC)MIL239624
  • (OCoLC)567805756

Library Locations

  • Architecture LibraryBorrow it
    Gould Hall 830 Van Vleet Oval Rm. 105, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.205706 -97.445050
  • Bizzell Memorial LibraryBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • Boorstin CollectionBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • Chinese Literature Translation ArchiveBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., RM 414, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • Engineering LibraryBorrow it
    Felgar Hall 865 Asp Avenue, Rm. 222, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.205706 -97.445050
  • Fine Arts LibraryBorrow it
    Catlett Music Center 500 West Boyd Street, Rm. 20, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.210371 -97.448244
  • Harry W. Bass Business History CollectionBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Rm. 521NW, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • History of Science CollectionsBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Rm. 521NW, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • John and Mary Nichols Rare Books and Special CollectionsBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Rm. 509NW, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • Library Service CenterBorrow it
    2601 Technology Place, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.185561 -97.398361
  • Price College Digital LibraryBorrow it
    Adams Hall 102 307 West Brooks St., Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.210371 -97.448244
  • Western History CollectionsBorrow it
    Monnet Hall 630 Parrington Oval, Rm. 300, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.209584 -97.445414
Processing Feedback ...