The Resource Competition, by P.A. Keddy, (electronic resource)

Competition, by P.A. Keddy, (electronic resource)

Label
Competition
Title
Competition
Statement of responsibility
by P.A. Keddy
Creator
Author
Author
Subject
Language
  • eng
  • eng
Summary
Competition is one of the most important factors controlling the distribution and abundance of living creatures. Sperm cells racing up reproductive tracts, beetle larvae battling inside single seeds, birds defending territories, and trees interfering with the light available to neighbours, are all engaged in competition for limited resources. Along with predation and mutualism, competition is one of the three major biological forces that assemble living communities. Recent experimental work, much of it only from the last few decades, has enhanced human knowledge of the prevalence of competition in nature. There are acacia trees that use ants to damage vines, beetles that compete in arenas for access to dung balls, tadpoles that apparently poison their neighbours, birds that smash the eggs of potential competitors, and plants that associate with fungi in order to increase access to soil resources. While intended as an up-to-date reference work on the state of this branch of ecology, the many non-technical examples will make interesting reading for those with a general interest in nature. Greatly expanded from the first prize-winning edition, there are entirely new chapters, including one on resources and another on competition gradients in nature. The author freely ranges across all major taxonomic groups in search of evidence. The question of whether competition occurs is no longer useful, the author maintains; rather the challenge is to determine when and where each kind of competition is important in natural systems. For this reason, variants of competition such as intensity, asymmetry and hierarchies are singled out for particular attention. The book concludes with the difficulties of finding general principles in complex ecological communities, and illustrates the limitations on knowledge that arise out of the biased conduct of scientists themselves. Competition can be found elsewhere in living systems other than ecological communities, at sub-microscopic scales in the interactions of enzymes and neural pathways, and over large geographic areas in the spread of human populations and contrasting ideas about the world. Human societies are therefore also examined for evidence of the kinds of competition found among other living organisms. Using an array of historical examples, including Biblical conflicts, the use of noblemen's sons in the Crusades, the Viking raids in Europe, strategic bombing campaigns in the Second World War, and ethnic battles of the Balkans, the book illustrates how most of the aspects of competition illustrated with plants and animals can be extended to the interactions of human beings and their societies
Member of
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Keddy, P.A
Dewey number
576.8
http://bibfra.me/vocab/relation/httpidlocgovvocabularyrelatorsaut
6b9BxiYIJXE
Image bit depth
0
Language note
English
LC call number
QH359-425
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Population and Community Biology Series
Series volume
26
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Evolution (Biology)
  • Evolutionary Biology
Label
Competition, by P.A. Keddy, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Bibliographic Level Mode of Issuance: Monograph
Antecedent source
mixed
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Color
not applicable
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Contents
1 Studying Competition -- 1.1 The Importance of Competition -- 1.2 Stress, Strain and the Costs of Competition -- 1.3 Other Views on the Definition of Competition -- 1.4 Kinds of Competition -- 1.5 Historical Foundations: The First Competition Experiment -- 1.6 Competitive Dominance -- 1.7 Competition and the Organization of Living Systems -- 1.8 Competition and Human Societies -- 1.9 Conclusion -- 2 Resources -- 2.1 Kinds of Resources -- 2.2 Resources for Primary Producers -- 2.3 Resources for Consumers -- 2.4 Experimental Studies of Foraging for Resources in Patchy Environments -- 2.5 Effects of Chronic Scarcity of Resources -- 2.6 Resource Levels Change with Time -- 2.7 Humans and Resources -- 2.8 Conclusion -- 3 Competition in Action -- 3.1 Case Studies of Intraspecific Competition -- 3.2 Case Studies of Interspecific Competition -- 3.3 Literature Review of Case Studies -- 3.4 The Current Situation -- 4 Choosing the Tools -- 4.1 Descriptive, Comparative and Experimental Studies -- 4.2 Descriptive Studies -- 4.3 Comparative Studies -- 4.4 Experimental Studies -- 4.5 Choosing a Research Path -- 5 Competitive Hierarchies -- 5.1 Patterns in Community Matrices -- 5.2 Eight Examples of Communities with Competitive Hierarchies -- 5.3 On the Consistency of Hierarchies -- 5.4 Monocultures and Mechanisms -- 5.5 Intra-and Intergroup Competition Among Humans -- 5.6 Conclusion -- 6 Traits and Competitive Performance -- 6.1 Relative Abundance Patterns -- 6.2 Ants -- 6.3 Plants -- 6.4 Amphibians -- 6.5 Apes -- 6.6 The Problem of Co-existence and Competitive Similarity -- 6.7 Conclusion: A Place for Everything -- 7 Competition Gradients -- 7.1 The Search for Gradients of Competition Intensity -- 7.2 Experimental Gradients -- 7.3 The Universal Constant of Competition -- 7.4 On Discrepancies and Reconciliations -- 7.5 Competition and Succession -- 7.6 Conclusion -- 8 Extending the Generality of Field Experiments -- 8.1 Criticisms Regarding Lack of Generality -- 8.2 Demonstrating Generality of Pattern -- 8.3 Using Increased Numbers of Species -- 8.4 Providing a Comparative Context -- 8.5 Using General Experimental Factors -- 8.6 Arrangement Along Gradients -- 8.7 Practical Trade-offs -- 8.8 A Large Scale Competition Experiment -- 8.9 Conclusion -- 9 Modelling Competition -- 9.1 Kinds of Models -- 9.2 The Lokta-Volterra Models -- 9.3 The MacArthur Model for Resource Subdivision -- 9.4 Loop Analysis and Apparent Competition -- 9.5 Competition Along Gradients -- 9.6 A Resource Competition Model -- 9.7 A Biomechanical Model -- 9.8 A Spatial Model -- 9.9 A Model of Behaviour and Habitat Use -- 9.10 Competitive Neighbourhood Models -- 9.11 Competition in Forests: The JABOWA and FORET Models -- 9.12 The Lateral Pressure Model for Global Conflict -- 9.13 The Richardson Arms Race Model -- 9.14 Two Graphical Models for Resource Partitioning -- 9.15 Obstacles to Testing Models -- 9.16 Conclusion -- 10 Competition, Pragmatism and Comparison -- 10.1 A Pragmatic Approach to Competition -- 10.2 The Search for General Patterns in Astronomy -- 10.3 Comparisons Among Habitats -- 10.4 Constraints on Competition in Plant Communities -- 10.5 Constraints on Competition in Animal Communities -- 10.6 Comparisons Among Organisms -- 10.7 Making Theories Operational for Hypothesis Testing -- 10.8 Experimental Stress and Disturbance Gradients -- 10.9 Meta-analysis in Competition Studies -- 10.10 Three Kinds of Community Structure (Resource Partitioning Revisited) -- 10.11 Competition, Resources and Tyranny -- 11 Goals and Obstacles in the Study of Competition -- 11.1 Setting Goals -- 11.2 Brains and Their Limitations -- 11.3 Choosing a Question -- 11.4 Choosing Appropriate Model Systems -- 11.5 Selecting a Conceptual Approach -- 11.6 Obstacles to Communication -- 11.7 Conclusion -- References
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
2nd Edition.
Extent
1 online resource (XVII, 552 p. 45 illus.)
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789401006941
Level of compression
uncompressed
Media category
computer
Media type code
c
Other control number
10.1007/978-94-010-0694-1
Quality assurance targets
absent
Reformatting quality
access
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (CKB)3400000000119964
  • (SSID)ssj0000923163
  • (PQKBManifestationID)11594882
  • (PQKBTitleCode)TC0000923163
  • (PQKBWorkID)10858918
  • (PQKB)11253551
  • (DE-He213)978-94-010-0694-1
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC3565772
  • (EXLCZ)993400000000119964
Label
Competition, by P.A. Keddy, (electronic resource)
Publication
Note
Bibliographic Level Mode of Issuance: Monograph
Antecedent source
mixed
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Color
not applicable
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Contents
1 Studying Competition -- 1.1 The Importance of Competition -- 1.2 Stress, Strain and the Costs of Competition -- 1.3 Other Views on the Definition of Competition -- 1.4 Kinds of Competition -- 1.5 Historical Foundations: The First Competition Experiment -- 1.6 Competitive Dominance -- 1.7 Competition and the Organization of Living Systems -- 1.8 Competition and Human Societies -- 1.9 Conclusion -- 2 Resources -- 2.1 Kinds of Resources -- 2.2 Resources for Primary Producers -- 2.3 Resources for Consumers -- 2.4 Experimental Studies of Foraging for Resources in Patchy Environments -- 2.5 Effects of Chronic Scarcity of Resources -- 2.6 Resource Levels Change with Time -- 2.7 Humans and Resources -- 2.8 Conclusion -- 3 Competition in Action -- 3.1 Case Studies of Intraspecific Competition -- 3.2 Case Studies of Interspecific Competition -- 3.3 Literature Review of Case Studies -- 3.4 The Current Situation -- 4 Choosing the Tools -- 4.1 Descriptive, Comparative and Experimental Studies -- 4.2 Descriptive Studies -- 4.3 Comparative Studies -- 4.4 Experimental Studies -- 4.5 Choosing a Research Path -- 5 Competitive Hierarchies -- 5.1 Patterns in Community Matrices -- 5.2 Eight Examples of Communities with Competitive Hierarchies -- 5.3 On the Consistency of Hierarchies -- 5.4 Monocultures and Mechanisms -- 5.5 Intra-and Intergroup Competition Among Humans -- 5.6 Conclusion -- 6 Traits and Competitive Performance -- 6.1 Relative Abundance Patterns -- 6.2 Ants -- 6.3 Plants -- 6.4 Amphibians -- 6.5 Apes -- 6.6 The Problem of Co-existence and Competitive Similarity -- 6.7 Conclusion: A Place for Everything -- 7 Competition Gradients -- 7.1 The Search for Gradients of Competition Intensity -- 7.2 Experimental Gradients -- 7.3 The Universal Constant of Competition -- 7.4 On Discrepancies and Reconciliations -- 7.5 Competition and Succession -- 7.6 Conclusion -- 8 Extending the Generality of Field Experiments -- 8.1 Criticisms Regarding Lack of Generality -- 8.2 Demonstrating Generality of Pattern -- 8.3 Using Increased Numbers of Species -- 8.4 Providing a Comparative Context -- 8.5 Using General Experimental Factors -- 8.6 Arrangement Along Gradients -- 8.7 Practical Trade-offs -- 8.8 A Large Scale Competition Experiment -- 8.9 Conclusion -- 9 Modelling Competition -- 9.1 Kinds of Models -- 9.2 The Lokta-Volterra Models -- 9.3 The MacArthur Model for Resource Subdivision -- 9.4 Loop Analysis and Apparent Competition -- 9.5 Competition Along Gradients -- 9.6 A Resource Competition Model -- 9.7 A Biomechanical Model -- 9.8 A Spatial Model -- 9.9 A Model of Behaviour and Habitat Use -- 9.10 Competitive Neighbourhood Models -- 9.11 Competition in Forests: The JABOWA and FORET Models -- 9.12 The Lateral Pressure Model for Global Conflict -- 9.13 The Richardson Arms Race Model -- 9.14 Two Graphical Models for Resource Partitioning -- 9.15 Obstacles to Testing Models -- 9.16 Conclusion -- 10 Competition, Pragmatism and Comparison -- 10.1 A Pragmatic Approach to Competition -- 10.2 The Search for General Patterns in Astronomy -- 10.3 Comparisons Among Habitats -- 10.4 Constraints on Competition in Plant Communities -- 10.5 Constraints on Competition in Animal Communities -- 10.6 Comparisons Among Organisms -- 10.7 Making Theories Operational for Hypothesis Testing -- 10.8 Experimental Stress and Disturbance Gradients -- 10.9 Meta-analysis in Competition Studies -- 10.10 Three Kinds of Community Structure (Resource Partitioning Revisited) -- 10.11 Competition, Resources and Tyranny -- 11 Goals and Obstacles in the Study of Competition -- 11.1 Setting Goals -- 11.2 Brains and Their Limitations -- 11.3 Choosing a Question -- 11.4 Choosing Appropriate Model Systems -- 11.5 Selecting a Conceptual Approach -- 11.6 Obstacles to Communication -- 11.7 Conclusion -- References
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
2nd Edition.
Extent
1 online resource (XVII, 552 p. 45 illus.)
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789401006941
Level of compression
uncompressed
Media category
computer
Media type code
c
Other control number
10.1007/978-94-010-0694-1
Quality assurance targets
absent
Reformatting quality
access
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (CKB)3400000000119964
  • (SSID)ssj0000923163
  • (PQKBManifestationID)11594882
  • (PQKBTitleCode)TC0000923163
  • (PQKBWorkID)10858918
  • (PQKB)11253551
  • (DE-He213)978-94-010-0694-1
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC3565772
  • (EXLCZ)993400000000119964

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