The Resource Cathodic protection field trials on prestressed concrete components, final report / J.E. Bennett and T.J. Schue

Cathodic protection field trials on prestressed concrete components, final report / J.E. Bennett and T.J. Schue

Label
Cathodic protection field trials on prestressed concrete components, final report / J.E. Bennett and T.J. Schue
Title
Cathodic protection field trials on prestressed concrete components, final report / J.E. Bennett and T.J. Schue
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
CBT
Funding information
Performed by ELTECH Research Corporation and sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration, Office of Engineering R & D under contract no.
Government publication
federal national government publication
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
LC call number
TG335
LC item number
.C38 1998
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • bibliography
  • technical reports
Period covered
Dec. 1991-Jan. 1997.
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Bennett, J. E
  • Schue, T. J
  • United States
  • Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center
  • ELTECH Research Corp
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Concrete bridges
  • Cathodic protection
  • Prestressed concrete
  • Metals
Type of report
Final report.
Label
Cathodic protection field trials on prestressed concrete components, final report / J.E. Bennett and T.J. Schue
Link
https://ntl.bts.gov/lib/6000/6300/6347/153.pdf
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • "January 1998."
  • Abstract: "This is the final report in a study to demonstrate the feasibility of using cathodic protection (CP) on concrete bridge structures containing prestressed steel. The interim report, FHWA-RD-95-032, has more details on the installation of selected CP systems. Past laboratory and test yard studies had indicated that overprotection could result in the evolution of atomic hydrogen and the embrittlement of prestressing steel. Systems utilizing catalyzed titanium mesh, conductive rubber, and arc-sprayed zinc anodes were installed on prestressed pilings and girders of the Howard Frankland Bridge in Tampa, Florida; and systems using flame-sprayed zinc and conductive paint anodes were installed on the soffit of prestressed box beams of the Abbey Road and West 130” Street bridges near Cleveland, Ohio. For most of the components tested, CP was achieved safely and reliably without reaching conditions that could result in embrittlement of prestressed steel. Operation of these CP systems was best achieved in constant voltage mode which, in most cases, prevented hydrogen generation. Analyses of data indicated that the application of CP had no adverse effect on either the mechanical properties of the prestressing steel or the bond between the prestressed steel and concrete. Two of the zones tested on bridges in Ohio experienced very non-uniform current density due to leaky joints, which caused localized regions of low resistance. In these cases, it was impossible to achieve CP criteria at sites where resistance was high, while at the same time precluding hydrogen generation at sites where resistance was low. Such prestressed concrete structures with leaky joints are not good candidates for CP. Also, Devanatban-type hydrogen probes used in this study were not reliable indicators of hydrogen generation, and the conductive paint anode used on the West 130” Street Bridge developed extensive blistering as a result of sensitivity to moisture content and/or brief periods of high current."
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 67-68)
Dimensions
28 cm.
Extent
vi, 68 p.
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
  • (OCoLC)38435427
  • (OCoLC)ocm38435427
Label
Cathodic protection field trials on prestressed concrete components, final report / J.E. Bennett and T.J. Schue
Link
https://ntl.bts.gov/lib/6000/6300/6347/153.pdf
Publication
Note
  • "January 1998."
  • Abstract: "This is the final report in a study to demonstrate the feasibility of using cathodic protection (CP) on concrete bridge structures containing prestressed steel. The interim report, FHWA-RD-95-032, has more details on the installation of selected CP systems. Past laboratory and test yard studies had indicated that overprotection could result in the evolution of atomic hydrogen and the embrittlement of prestressing steel. Systems utilizing catalyzed titanium mesh, conductive rubber, and arc-sprayed zinc anodes were installed on prestressed pilings and girders of the Howard Frankland Bridge in Tampa, Florida; and systems using flame-sprayed zinc and conductive paint anodes were installed on the soffit of prestressed box beams of the Abbey Road and West 130” Street bridges near Cleveland, Ohio. For most of the components tested, CP was achieved safely and reliably without reaching conditions that could result in embrittlement of prestressed steel. Operation of these CP systems was best achieved in constant voltage mode which, in most cases, prevented hydrogen generation. Analyses of data indicated that the application of CP had no adverse effect on either the mechanical properties of the prestressing steel or the bond between the prestressed steel and concrete. Two of the zones tested on bridges in Ohio experienced very non-uniform current density due to leaky joints, which caused localized regions of low resistance. In these cases, it was impossible to achieve CP criteria at sites where resistance was high, while at the same time precluding hydrogen generation at sites where resistance was low. Such prestressed concrete structures with leaky joints are not good candidates for CP. Also, Devanatban-type hydrogen probes used in this study were not reliable indicators of hydrogen generation, and the conductive paint anode used on the West 130” Street Bridge developed extensive blistering as a result of sensitivity to moisture content and/or brief periods of high current."
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 67-68)
Dimensions
28 cm.
Extent
vi, 68 p.
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
  • (OCoLC)38435427
  • (OCoLC)ocm38435427

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