The Resource Borelli's On the movement of animals -- On the force of percussion, Giovanni Alfonso Borelli ; translated by Paul Maquet

Borelli's On the movement of animals -- On the force of percussion, Giovanni Alfonso Borelli ; translated by Paul Maquet

Label
Borelli's On the movement of animals -- On the force of percussion
Title
Borelli's On the movement of animals -- On the force of percussion
Statement of responsibility
Giovanni Alfonso Borelli ; translated by Paul Maquet
Title variation
  • On the movement of animals
  • On the force of percussion
Creator
Contributor
Author
Translator
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • ita
  • eng
Summary
This volume provides an introduction to Borelli?s theory on the movement of animals and demonstrates the nature of the energy of percussion, its causes, properties and effects. Building on and moving away from the theory of mechanics as formulated by Aristotle and Galileo, and countering objections expressed by Stephani degli Angeli among others, Borelli presents a completely mechanical account of the action of muscles, and analyzes the way in which the center of gravity of the animal shifts in locomotion. Originally published in Italian in 1667, then translated into Latin in 1686, the text of this volume has now been translated into English, making the text accessible to a wide readership. This volume is the first of two volumes that contain the Introduction and physical-mathematical illustrations necessary to understand Giovanni Alfonso Borelli?s work On the Movement of Animals, the founding text of seventeenth century biomechanics. The second volume, entitled On The Natural Motions Resulting From Gravity, describes his theory and scientific experiments relating to the natural movements of bodies in a fluid environment
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1608-1679
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Borelli, Giovanni Alfonso
Dewey number
573.7/9
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
LC call number
QP301
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Maquet M., Paul
Series statement
Studies in History and Philosophy of Science,
Series volume
volume 37
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Motion
  • Gravity
  • Animal locomotion
  • SOCIAL SCIENCE
  • Animal locomotion
  • Gravity
  • Motion
Label
Borelli's On the movement of animals -- On the force of percussion, Giovanni Alfonso Borelli ; translated by Paul Maquet
Link
https://ezproxy.lib.ou.edu/login?url=http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-3-319-08497-8
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Foreword of the Author.- Chapter I On the nature of movement in general.- Chapter II On the causes and principles of movement.- Chapter III Projectiles after being separated from their impeller are not moved forwards by the fluid environment in which they are. Chapter IV Projectiles are moved forwards by a virtue impressed by the throwing subject, after they are separated from the latter.- Chapter V On the properties and actions of the motive virtue.- Chapter VI How the impetus of the throwing subject is distributed and transmitted in the projectiles and why it is decreased.- Chapter VII The velocity which is transmitted by the blow to the projected body, by its nature, is distributed, not over a certain time, but in an instant.- Chapter VIII The velocity transmitted in elastic and not absolutely hard bodies by a striking blow is not impressed in one instant but in several successive instants of the time.- Chapter IX The velocity impressed in a projectile is uniform by its nature and perpetually durable.- Chapter X On the proportion of percussions carried out in a body absolutely stable or movable.- Chapter XI On the variety of percussions, which originates from the movement and the position of the bodies receiving the blow -- Chapter XII On the percussion of bodies colliding obliquely on a stable plane.- Chapter XIII On the percussion of bodies colliding in oblique movements.- Chapter XIV On the variety of percussions carried out by the impetus of a curved and accelerated movement.- Chapter XV On the rebound which follows the percussion of bodies.- Chapter XVI How the impetus is weakened and extinguished in projectiles.- Chapter XVII The impetus impressed in any body can be weakened and diminished instantaneously because of its diffusion but it an be completely deleted and annihilated only over some time, although we can suspect that movement is responsible neither of its beginning nor of its end.- Chapter XVIII How an impetus impressed in elastic bodies is slowed down and extinguished.- Chapter XIX Why opposite movements annihilate each other and renew themselves in elastic and resilient bodies.- Chapter XX On the flow of impetus and on its magnitude.- Chapter XXI Moving bodies are urged at an uniform velocity never to be annihilated -- Chapter XXII How can an accelerated movement be generated.- Chapter XXIII On the natural motive faculty of gravity.- Chapter XXIV The force of the impetus of falling heavy bodies is smaller than any impulsive force impressed by a projectile.- Chapter XXV Digression on the reason why a magnet attracts iron.- Chapter XXVI All solid bodies are not absolutely hard but they are either fluent or soft or elastic.- Chapter XXVII On the comparison between the energy of percussion and the compressive force of gravity.- Chapter XXVIII Explanation of the problem and enquiry on the actual causes of this wonderful effect.- Chapter XXIX The energy of percussion is greater than the compressive force of any finite heavy body.- Chapter XXX On shaking of bodies -- Chapter XXXI More accurate investigation of the cause of vibration.- Chapter XXXII The smallest motive force of any body, by a slow movement, can impress and increase in a huge body a velocity greater than that at which the impeller moved.- Chapter XXXIII The impetus of a percussion cannot be measured by the simple energy of gravity.- Chapter XXXIV Examination of the question 19 in the Mechanics of Aristotle.- Answer to some considerations and objections of R.P.F. Stephano Degli Angeli, concerning his book On the force of Percussion.- Answer to Sir Michelo Angelo Ricci
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xxxviii, 220 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319084978
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
SpringerLink
Other control number
10.1007/978-3-319-08497-8
Other physical details
illustrations.
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (OCoLC)894509395
  • (OCoLC)ocn894509395
Label
Borelli's On the movement of animals -- On the force of percussion, Giovanni Alfonso Borelli ; translated by Paul Maquet
Link
https://ezproxy.lib.ou.edu/login?url=http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-3-319-08497-8
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Foreword of the Author.- Chapter I On the nature of movement in general.- Chapter II On the causes and principles of movement.- Chapter III Projectiles after being separated from their impeller are not moved forwards by the fluid environment in which they are. Chapter IV Projectiles are moved forwards by a virtue impressed by the throwing subject, after they are separated from the latter.- Chapter V On the properties and actions of the motive virtue.- Chapter VI How the impetus of the throwing subject is distributed and transmitted in the projectiles and why it is decreased.- Chapter VII The velocity which is transmitted by the blow to the projected body, by its nature, is distributed, not over a certain time, but in an instant.- Chapter VIII The velocity transmitted in elastic and not absolutely hard bodies by a striking blow is not impressed in one instant but in several successive instants of the time.- Chapter IX The velocity impressed in a projectile is uniform by its nature and perpetually durable.- Chapter X On the proportion of percussions carried out in a body absolutely stable or movable.- Chapter XI On the variety of percussions, which originates from the movement and the position of the bodies receiving the blow -- Chapter XII On the percussion of bodies colliding obliquely on a stable plane.- Chapter XIII On the percussion of bodies colliding in oblique movements.- Chapter XIV On the variety of percussions carried out by the impetus of a curved and accelerated movement.- Chapter XV On the rebound which follows the percussion of bodies.- Chapter XVI How the impetus is weakened and extinguished in projectiles.- Chapter XVII The impetus impressed in any body can be weakened and diminished instantaneously because of its diffusion but it an be completely deleted and annihilated only over some time, although we can suspect that movement is responsible neither of its beginning nor of its end.- Chapter XVIII How an impetus impressed in elastic bodies is slowed down and extinguished.- Chapter XIX Why opposite movements annihilate each other and renew themselves in elastic and resilient bodies.- Chapter XX On the flow of impetus and on its magnitude.- Chapter XXI Moving bodies are urged at an uniform velocity never to be annihilated -- Chapter XXII How can an accelerated movement be generated.- Chapter XXIII On the natural motive faculty of gravity.- Chapter XXIV The force of the impetus of falling heavy bodies is smaller than any impulsive force impressed by a projectile.- Chapter XXV Digression on the reason why a magnet attracts iron.- Chapter XXVI All solid bodies are not absolutely hard but they are either fluent or soft or elastic.- Chapter XXVII On the comparison between the energy of percussion and the compressive force of gravity.- Chapter XXVIII Explanation of the problem and enquiry on the actual causes of this wonderful effect.- Chapter XXIX The energy of percussion is greater than the compressive force of any finite heavy body.- Chapter XXX On shaking of bodies -- Chapter XXXI More accurate investigation of the cause of vibration.- Chapter XXXII The smallest motive force of any body, by a slow movement, can impress and increase in a huge body a velocity greater than that at which the impeller moved.- Chapter XXXIII The impetus of a percussion cannot be measured by the simple energy of gravity.- Chapter XXXIV Examination of the question 19 in the Mechanics of Aristotle.- Answer to some considerations and objections of R.P.F. Stephano Degli Angeli, concerning his book On the force of Percussion.- Answer to Sir Michelo Angelo Ricci
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xxxviii, 220 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319084978
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
SpringerLink
Other control number
10.1007/978-3-319-08497-8
Other physical details
illustrations.
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (OCoLC)894509395
  • (OCoLC)ocn894509395

Library Locations

  • Architecture LibraryBorrow it
    Gould Hall 830 Van Vleet Oval Rm. 105, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.205706 -97.445050
  • Bizzell Memorial LibraryBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • Boorstin CollectionBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • Chinese Literature Translation ArchiveBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., RM 414, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • Engineering LibraryBorrow it
    Felgar Hall 865 Asp Avenue, Rm. 222, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.205706 -97.445050
  • Fine Arts LibraryBorrow it
    Catlett Music Center 500 West Boyd Street, Rm. 20, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.210371 -97.448244
  • Harry W. Bass Business History CollectionBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Rm. 521NW, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • History of Science CollectionsBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Rm. 521NW, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • John and Mary Nichols Rare Books and Special CollectionsBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Rm. 509NW, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • Library Service CenterBorrow it
    2601 Technology Place, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.185561 -97.398361
  • Price College Digital LibraryBorrow it
    Adams Hall 102 307 West Brooks St., Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.210371 -97.448244
  • Western History CollectionsBorrow it
    Monnet Hall 630 Parrington Oval, Rm. 300, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.209584 -97.445414
Processing Feedback ...