The Resource Air power as a coercive instrument, Daniel L. Byman, Matthew C. Waxman, Eric Larson, (electronic resource)

Air power as a coercive instrument, Daniel L. Byman, Matthew C. Waxman, Eric Larson, (electronic resource)

Label
Air power as a coercive instrument
Title
Air power as a coercive instrument
Statement of responsibility
Daniel L. Byman, Matthew C. Waxman, Eric Larson
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • eng
Summary
Coercion--the use of threatened force to induce an adversary to change its behavior--is a critical function of the U.S. military. U.S. forces have recently fought in the Balkans, the Persian Gulf, and the Horn of Africa to compel recalcitrant regimes and warlords to stop repression, abandon weapons programs, permit humanitarian relief, and otherwise modify their actions. Yet despite its overwhelming military might, the United States often fails to coerce successfully. This report examines the phenomenon of coercion and how air power can contribute to its success. Three factors increase the lik
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1967-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Byman, Daniel
Dewey number
  • 358.4
  • 358.414
  • 358.4140973
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Language note
English
LC call number
UG633
LC item number
.B94 1999
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
  • 1957-
  • 1972-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Project Air Force (U.S.)
  • Rand Corporation
  • Larson, Eric V.
  • Waxman, Matthew C.
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Air power
  • Air power
  • Military planning
Label
Air power as a coercive instrument, Daniel L. Byman, Matthew C. Waxman, Eric Larson, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • "MR-1061-AF."
  • "Project Air Force, Rand"
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Contents
  • Cover; Preface; Contents; Figures; Tables; Summary; Acknowledgements; Chapter One - Introduction; Coercion and U.S. National Security Policy; The Role of the USAF; Methodology and Cases Examined; Organization; Part 1. Definitions and Theory; Chapter Two - How to Think About Coercion; Definitions; A Theoretical Starting Point; Thinking about Coercion: a Policymaker's Perspective; Problem One: Limited Relevance; Problem Two: Measurement Pathologies; The Uncertain Meaning of "Success"; Conclusions; Part 2. Successful Coercive Diplomacy: Lessons from the Past
  • Chapter Three - Explaining Success or Failure: the Historical RecordConditions for Successful Coercion; Escalation Dominance; Threatening to Defeat an Adversary's Strategy; Coercion in Context: Magnifying Third-Party Threats; Common Challenges in Coercive Operations; Intelligence and Estimation Challenges; Misperceptions and Coercion; Credibility Challenges; Feasibility Challenges; Conclusions; Part 3. Coercive Diplomacy Today; Chapter Four - Domestic Constraints on Coercion; Domestic Politics and the Success of Coercive Diplomacy; Contraints and the Democratic System
  • The Challenge of Obtaining Domestic SupportConsequences of Low Support; Sources of Domestic Constraints; Declaratory Policy; Congressional Checks and Balances, and Other Restrictions; The Press; Some Correlates of Public Support; Some Conditions Under Which Support Is Typically High; How an Adversary can Exploit U.S. Domestic Politics; Diminishing the Interests; Tarnishing the Cause and Conduct of the Operation; Dragging Out a Conflict; Imposing Costs; Manipulating Asymmetries in Escalation Preferences; Conclusions; Chapter Five - Coercion and Coaliitions
  • The Advantages of Coalitions for CoercersLimits Imposed by Coalitions; Lack of a Common Agenda; Shared Control; Limits to Escalation; Reduced Credibility; Coalitions and Adversary Counter-Coercion; Conclusions; Chapter Six - Coercing Nonstate Actors: a Challenge for the Future; Types of Missions; Coercing Local Warlords; Coercing State Sponsors; Characteristics of Coercive Operations Against Nonstate Actors; Nonstate Adversaries May Lack Identifiable andTargetable Assets; Inaccurate Intelligence Estimates Are Particularly Common; Nonstate Adversaries May Lack Control over ConstituentElements
  • Indirect Coercion Is Often Difficult, Unreliable, and CounterproductiveNonstate Actors Are Adept at Exploiting Countermeasures toCoercion; Conclusions; Part 4. Coercion and the U.S. Air Force; Chapter Seven - Implications and Recommendations for the USAF; Air Power and Escalation Dominance; Air Power and Adversary Military Operations; Air Power and the Magnification of Third-Party Threats; Air Power and Common Challenges in Coercive Operations; The Need for Restraint; Appendix A - Cases Examined for this Study; Appendix B - Cases and Conditions for Success
  • Appendix C - Coercive Attempts and Common Challenges
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (193 p.)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9786612451096
Media category
computer
Media type code
c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (CKB)111004368714946
  • (EBL)475036
  • (SSID)ssj0000100691
  • (PQKBManifestationID)11124604
  • (PQKBTitleCode)TC0000100691
  • (PQKBWorkID)10037288
  • (PQKB)11276871
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC475036
  • (EXLCZ)99111004368714946
Label
Air power as a coercive instrument, Daniel L. Byman, Matthew C. Waxman, Eric Larson, (electronic resource)
Publication
Note
  • "MR-1061-AF."
  • "Project Air Force, Rand"
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Contents
  • Cover; Preface; Contents; Figures; Tables; Summary; Acknowledgements; Chapter One - Introduction; Coercion and U.S. National Security Policy; The Role of the USAF; Methodology and Cases Examined; Organization; Part 1. Definitions and Theory; Chapter Two - How to Think About Coercion; Definitions; A Theoretical Starting Point; Thinking about Coercion: a Policymaker's Perspective; Problem One: Limited Relevance; Problem Two: Measurement Pathologies; The Uncertain Meaning of "Success"; Conclusions; Part 2. Successful Coercive Diplomacy: Lessons from the Past
  • Chapter Three - Explaining Success or Failure: the Historical RecordConditions for Successful Coercion; Escalation Dominance; Threatening to Defeat an Adversary's Strategy; Coercion in Context: Magnifying Third-Party Threats; Common Challenges in Coercive Operations; Intelligence and Estimation Challenges; Misperceptions and Coercion; Credibility Challenges; Feasibility Challenges; Conclusions; Part 3. Coercive Diplomacy Today; Chapter Four - Domestic Constraints on Coercion; Domestic Politics and the Success of Coercive Diplomacy; Contraints and the Democratic System
  • The Challenge of Obtaining Domestic SupportConsequences of Low Support; Sources of Domestic Constraints; Declaratory Policy; Congressional Checks and Balances, and Other Restrictions; The Press; Some Correlates of Public Support; Some Conditions Under Which Support Is Typically High; How an Adversary can Exploit U.S. Domestic Politics; Diminishing the Interests; Tarnishing the Cause and Conduct of the Operation; Dragging Out a Conflict; Imposing Costs; Manipulating Asymmetries in Escalation Preferences; Conclusions; Chapter Five - Coercion and Coaliitions
  • The Advantages of Coalitions for CoercersLimits Imposed by Coalitions; Lack of a Common Agenda; Shared Control; Limits to Escalation; Reduced Credibility; Coalitions and Adversary Counter-Coercion; Conclusions; Chapter Six - Coercing Nonstate Actors: a Challenge for the Future; Types of Missions; Coercing Local Warlords; Coercing State Sponsors; Characteristics of Coercive Operations Against Nonstate Actors; Nonstate Adversaries May Lack Identifiable andTargetable Assets; Inaccurate Intelligence Estimates Are Particularly Common; Nonstate Adversaries May Lack Control over ConstituentElements
  • Indirect Coercion Is Often Difficult, Unreliable, and CounterproductiveNonstate Actors Are Adept at Exploiting Countermeasures toCoercion; Conclusions; Part 4. Coercion and the U.S. Air Force; Chapter Seven - Implications and Recommendations for the USAF; Air Power and Escalation Dominance; Air Power and Adversary Military Operations; Air Power and the Magnification of Third-Party Threats; Air Power and Common Challenges in Coercive Operations; The Need for Restraint; Appendix A - Cases Examined for this Study; Appendix B - Cases and Conditions for Success
  • Appendix C - Coercive Attempts and Common Challenges
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (193 p.)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9786612451096
Media category
computer
Media type code
c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (CKB)111004368714946
  • (EBL)475036
  • (SSID)ssj0000100691
  • (PQKBManifestationID)11124604
  • (PQKBTitleCode)TC0000100691
  • (PQKBWorkID)10037288
  • (PQKB)11276871
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC475036
  • (EXLCZ)99111004368714946

Library Locations

  • Architecture LibraryBorrow it
    Gould Hall 830 Van Vleet Oval Rm. 105, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.205706 -97.445050
  • Bizzell Memorial LibraryBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • Boorstin CollectionBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • Chinese Literature Translation ArchiveBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., RM 414, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • Engineering LibraryBorrow it
    Felgar Hall 865 Asp Avenue, Rm. 222, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.205706 -97.445050
  • Fine Arts LibraryBorrow it
    Catlett Music Center 500 West Boyd Street, Rm. 20, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.210371 -97.448244
  • Harry W. Bass Business History CollectionBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Rm. 521NW, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • History of Science CollectionsBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Rm. 521NW, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • John and Mary Nichols Rare Books and Special CollectionsBorrow it
    401 W. Brooks St., Rm. 509NW, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.207487 -97.447906
  • Library Service CenterBorrow it
    2601 Technology Place, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.185561 -97.398361
  • Price College Digital LibraryBorrow it
    Adams Hall 102 307 West Brooks St., Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.210371 -97.448244
  • Western History CollectionsBorrow it
    Monnet Hall 630 Parrington Oval, Rm. 300, Norman, OK, 73019, US
    35.209584 -97.445414
Processing Feedback ...