The Resource A performer's guide to Baroque music, Robert Donington

A performer's guide to Baroque music, Robert Donington

Label
A performer's guide to Baroque music
Title
A performer's guide to Baroque music
Statement of responsibility
Robert Donington
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Donington, Robert
Dewey number
780/.9032
Illustrations
music
Index
index present
LC call number
ML457
LC item number
.D65 1974
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Performance practice (Music)
  • Performance practice (Music)
  • Style, Musical
  • Performance practice (Music)
  • Style, Musical
Label
A performer's guide to Baroque music, Robert Donington
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 301-306) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
PART ONE: THE BAROQUE ATTITUDE -- 1. Composer and Performer -- [1.1 Why a book on performing baroque music? -- 1.2 Encouraging individuality in the performer -- 1.3 Keeping in style -- 1.4 Being faithful to history -- 1.5 Aiming at substantial authenticity] -- 2. Feeling in Baroque Music -- [2.1 Strong feeling appropraite in baroque music -- 2.2 Evidence of strong feeling in baroque music -- 2.3 Variteties of feelng in baroque music -- 2.4 Adding baroque styles to one's resources] -- 3. THe Text and the Performer -- [3.1 Three areas of hidden difference -- 3.2 Back to the original text? -- 3.3 Editions scholarly and unscholarly -- 3.4 Be your own editor] -- 4. Style and the Performer -- [4.1 Relying less on the text and more on the style -- 4.2 A preference for spontaneity -- 4.3 Notes left to the performer -- 3.4 Experssion left to the performer -- 4.5 Composer and performer -- 4.6 Substance not semblance -- 4.7 Asking the right questions] -- 5. Performing Spontaeously -- [5.1 In baroque music the performer is king -- 5.2 Recapturing a baroque spontaneity -- 5.3 Editor and performer] -- PART TWO: THE BAROQUE SOUND -- 6. Sound and Sense -- [6.1 Matching the sound to music -- 6.2 Transparency and incisiveness -- 6.3 THe choice of intruments and the use of instruments] -- 7. The Choice of Instruments -- [7.1 Instruments largely a performer's choice -- 7.2 The baroque orchestra more colourful than standardized -- 7.3 The orchestral continuo --7.4 Conducting -- 7.5 Pitch and emperament -- 7.6 The effectiveness of authentic sonorities -- 7.7 How far compromise is desirable] -- 8. The Use of Intruments -- [8.1 Use of insturments as important as choice -- 8.2 Good baroque music never mechanical -- 8.3 Electronic Bach -- 8.4 Flexibility necessary to baroque performance -- 8.5 Mental image and acousitc limits -- 8.6 A oracticable baroque orchesta] -- 9. The Voice -- [9.1 The decline in voice-production -- 9.2 Descriptions of baroque voice-production -- 9.3 Recordings of bel canto voice-production -- 9.4 The decline of the bel canto style -- 9.5 The probable similarity of all bel canto technique -- 9.6 Main feautres of bel canto technique -- 9.7 The necessity for bel canto -- 9.8 The revival of the counterenor voice -- 9.9 The loss of the castrato voice -- 9.10 Bel canto and the baroque choir] -- 10. Strings [10.1 Adapting technique to style -- 10.2 Changes in fittings -- 10.3 Changes in the bow -- 10.4 The double-bass -- 10.5 Holding the instrument -- 10.6 Holding the bow -- 10.7 Finger technique -- 10.8 Vibrato -- 10.9 Bow technique -- 10.10 The family of viols -- 10.11 Plucked instruments] -- 11. Wind and percussion [11.1 The winds more variable than the strings -- 11.2 The flutes -- 11.3 The reeds -- 11.4 The brass -- 11.5 The drums and other percussion] -- 12. Keyboards [12.1 Changing preferences in keyboard instruments -- 12.2 The harpsichord -- 12.3 The clavichord -- 12.4 The organ] -- PART THREE: THE NOTES -- 13. The problem of accidentals [13.1 Why baroque accidentals are difficult -- 13.2 Baroque signs for accidentals -- 13.3 Key signatures -- 13.4 Baroque accidentals affected by context -- 13.5 How far forward do baroque accidentals work? -- 13.6 Where do baroque accidentals work backwards too? -- 13.7 When did our bar-line convention come in?] -- 14. The treatment of accidentals [14.1 Certain considerations helpful over accidentlas -- 14.2 Accidentals in figured bass -- 14.3 Tablature as a check on accidentals -- 14.4 Consistency as q guide to accidentals -- 14.5 Indications from the melody -- 14.6 Indications from the harmony -- 14.7 Precautionary accidentals -- 14.8 Certain situations requiring accidentals -- 14.9 Sharpening the leading note -- 14.10 Sharp six implied by sharp seven -- 14.11 Flattening at the peak of a phrase -- 14.12 Sharpening at the trough of a phrase -- 14.13 Avoiding undesired tritones -- 14.14 Introducing the Picardy Third -- 14.15 Taking responsibility for baroque accidentals] -- 15. Ornamentation [15.1 Ornamentation a necessity in baroque music -- 15.2 Ornamentation in the reciting style -- 15.3 Vocal ornamentation for its own sake -- 15.4 Instrumental ornamentation -- 15.5 Baroque ornamentation in practice] -- 16. Ornaments [16.1 Simplifying the complexity of baroque ornaments -- 16.2 Appoggiaturas -- 16.3 The so-called 'passing appoggiatura' -- 16.4 Appoggiaturas in recitative -- 16.5 The acciaccatura and the slide -- 16.6 Tremolo and vibrato -- 16.7 Trills -- 16.8 Mordents -- 16.9 Turns and other changing or passing notes -- 16.10 Compound ornaments] -- 17. Accompaniment [17.1 The wide variety of baroque accompaniment -- 17.2 Improvisation the best realization -- 17.3 The harmony of the accompaniment -- 17.4 How full an accompaniment -- 17.5 How correct an accompaniment -- 17.6 How widely spaced an accompaniment -- 17.7 How independent an accompaniment -- 17.8 What instruments of accompaniment -- 17.9 Accompanying recitative -- 17.10 Instruments for accompanying recitative -- 17.11 Handel as accompanist -- 17.12 The delayed cadence in recitative] -- PART FOUR: THE EXPRESSION -- 18. Tempo [18.1 Musicianship the necessary judge of tempo -- 18.2 Time-words vague and misleading -- 18.3 Time-signatures in chaotic confusion -- 18.4 Tempo judged by dancing speeds -- 18.5 Tempo judged from the character of the music -- 18.6 Variations of tempo -- 18.7 The timing of recitative -- 18.8 Rallentandos] -- 19. Rhythm [19.1 Conventions of rhythmic alteration -- 19.2 Inequality -- 19.3 Varieties of inequality -- 19.4 Conditions for inequality -- 19.5 Examples of inequality -- 19.6 Dotting -- 19.7 Varieties of dotting -- 19.8 Conditions for variable dotting -- 19.9 Examples of variable dotting -- 19.10 Triplets -- 19.11 French overture style -- 19.12 French overture style in practice -- 19.13 Tempo Rubato in the baroque sense] -- 20. Punctuation [20.1 Phrasing -- 20.2 Articulation -- 20.3 Underlay] -- 21. Dynamics [21.1 Louds and softs -- 21.2 Crescendos and diminuendos -- 21.3 The overall dynamics and the fine fluctuations -- 21.4 Balance -- 21.5 Accentuation -- 21.6 The hemiola] -- 22. Then and now [22.1 The pleasure of unfamiliarity -- 22.2 The pleasure of naturalness -- 22.3 The point of authenticity] -- Reading list -- Index
Dimensions
26 cm
Extent
320 pages
Isbn
9780684131559
Lccn
72003659
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
music
System control number
  • (OCoLC)817377
  • (OCoLC)ocm00817377
Label
A performer's guide to Baroque music, Robert Donington
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 301-306) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
PART ONE: THE BAROQUE ATTITUDE -- 1. Composer and Performer -- [1.1 Why a book on performing baroque music? -- 1.2 Encouraging individuality in the performer -- 1.3 Keeping in style -- 1.4 Being faithful to history -- 1.5 Aiming at substantial authenticity] -- 2. Feeling in Baroque Music -- [2.1 Strong feeling appropraite in baroque music -- 2.2 Evidence of strong feeling in baroque music -- 2.3 Variteties of feelng in baroque music -- 2.4 Adding baroque styles to one's resources] -- 3. THe Text and the Performer -- [3.1 Three areas of hidden difference -- 3.2 Back to the original text? -- 3.3 Editions scholarly and unscholarly -- 3.4 Be your own editor] -- 4. Style and the Performer -- [4.1 Relying less on the text and more on the style -- 4.2 A preference for spontaneity -- 4.3 Notes left to the performer -- 3.4 Experssion left to the performer -- 4.5 Composer and performer -- 4.6 Substance not semblance -- 4.7 Asking the right questions] -- 5. Performing Spontaeously -- [5.1 In baroque music the performer is king -- 5.2 Recapturing a baroque spontaneity -- 5.3 Editor and performer] -- PART TWO: THE BAROQUE SOUND -- 6. Sound and Sense -- [6.1 Matching the sound to music -- 6.2 Transparency and incisiveness -- 6.3 THe choice of intruments and the use of instruments] -- 7. The Choice of Instruments -- [7.1 Instruments largely a performer's choice -- 7.2 The baroque orchestra more colourful than standardized -- 7.3 The orchestral continuo --7.4 Conducting -- 7.5 Pitch and emperament -- 7.6 The effectiveness of authentic sonorities -- 7.7 How far compromise is desirable] -- 8. The Use of Intruments -- [8.1 Use of insturments as important as choice -- 8.2 Good baroque music never mechanical -- 8.3 Electronic Bach -- 8.4 Flexibility necessary to baroque performance -- 8.5 Mental image and acousitc limits -- 8.6 A oracticable baroque orchesta] -- 9. The Voice -- [9.1 The decline in voice-production -- 9.2 Descriptions of baroque voice-production -- 9.3 Recordings of bel canto voice-production -- 9.4 The decline of the bel canto style -- 9.5 The probable similarity of all bel canto technique -- 9.6 Main feautres of bel canto technique -- 9.7 The necessity for bel canto -- 9.8 The revival of the counterenor voice -- 9.9 The loss of the castrato voice -- 9.10 Bel canto and the baroque choir] -- 10. Strings [10.1 Adapting technique to style -- 10.2 Changes in fittings -- 10.3 Changes in the bow -- 10.4 The double-bass -- 10.5 Holding the instrument -- 10.6 Holding the bow -- 10.7 Finger technique -- 10.8 Vibrato -- 10.9 Bow technique -- 10.10 The family of viols -- 10.11 Plucked instruments] -- 11. Wind and percussion [11.1 The winds more variable than the strings -- 11.2 The flutes -- 11.3 The reeds -- 11.4 The brass -- 11.5 The drums and other percussion] -- 12. Keyboards [12.1 Changing preferences in keyboard instruments -- 12.2 The harpsichord -- 12.3 The clavichord -- 12.4 The organ] -- PART THREE: THE NOTES -- 13. The problem of accidentals [13.1 Why baroque accidentals are difficult -- 13.2 Baroque signs for accidentals -- 13.3 Key signatures -- 13.4 Baroque accidentals affected by context -- 13.5 How far forward do baroque accidentals work? -- 13.6 Where do baroque accidentals work backwards too? -- 13.7 When did our bar-line convention come in?] -- 14. The treatment of accidentals [14.1 Certain considerations helpful over accidentlas -- 14.2 Accidentals in figured bass -- 14.3 Tablature as a check on accidentals -- 14.4 Consistency as q guide to accidentals -- 14.5 Indications from the melody -- 14.6 Indications from the harmony -- 14.7 Precautionary accidentals -- 14.8 Certain situations requiring accidentals -- 14.9 Sharpening the leading note -- 14.10 Sharp six implied by sharp seven -- 14.11 Flattening at the peak of a phrase -- 14.12 Sharpening at the trough of a phrase -- 14.13 Avoiding undesired tritones -- 14.14 Introducing the Picardy Third -- 14.15 Taking responsibility for baroque accidentals] -- 15. Ornamentation [15.1 Ornamentation a necessity in baroque music -- 15.2 Ornamentation in the reciting style -- 15.3 Vocal ornamentation for its own sake -- 15.4 Instrumental ornamentation -- 15.5 Baroque ornamentation in practice] -- 16. Ornaments [16.1 Simplifying the complexity of baroque ornaments -- 16.2 Appoggiaturas -- 16.3 The so-called 'passing appoggiatura' -- 16.4 Appoggiaturas in recitative -- 16.5 The acciaccatura and the slide -- 16.6 Tremolo and vibrato -- 16.7 Trills -- 16.8 Mordents -- 16.9 Turns and other changing or passing notes -- 16.10 Compound ornaments] -- 17. Accompaniment [17.1 The wide variety of baroque accompaniment -- 17.2 Improvisation the best realization -- 17.3 The harmony of the accompaniment -- 17.4 How full an accompaniment -- 17.5 How correct an accompaniment -- 17.6 How widely spaced an accompaniment -- 17.7 How independent an accompaniment -- 17.8 What instruments of accompaniment -- 17.9 Accompanying recitative -- 17.10 Instruments for accompanying recitative -- 17.11 Handel as accompanist -- 17.12 The delayed cadence in recitative] -- PART FOUR: THE EXPRESSION -- 18. Tempo [18.1 Musicianship the necessary judge of tempo -- 18.2 Time-words vague and misleading -- 18.3 Time-signatures in chaotic confusion -- 18.4 Tempo judged by dancing speeds -- 18.5 Tempo judged from the character of the music -- 18.6 Variations of tempo -- 18.7 The timing of recitative -- 18.8 Rallentandos] -- 19. Rhythm [19.1 Conventions of rhythmic alteration -- 19.2 Inequality -- 19.3 Varieties of inequality -- 19.4 Conditions for inequality -- 19.5 Examples of inequality -- 19.6 Dotting -- 19.7 Varieties of dotting -- 19.8 Conditions for variable dotting -- 19.9 Examples of variable dotting -- 19.10 Triplets -- 19.11 French overture style -- 19.12 French overture style in practice -- 19.13 Tempo Rubato in the baroque sense] -- 20. Punctuation [20.1 Phrasing -- 20.2 Articulation -- 20.3 Underlay] -- 21. Dynamics [21.1 Louds and softs -- 21.2 Crescendos and diminuendos -- 21.3 The overall dynamics and the fine fluctuations -- 21.4 Balance -- 21.5 Accentuation -- 21.6 The hemiola] -- 22. Then and now [22.1 The pleasure of unfamiliarity -- 22.2 The pleasure of naturalness -- 22.3 The point of authenticity] -- Reading list -- Index
Dimensions
26 cm
Extent
320 pages
Isbn
9780684131559
Lccn
72003659
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
music
System control number
  • (OCoLC)817377
  • (OCoLC)ocm00817377

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